conference-talk

GPTL: A simple and free general purpose tool for performance analysis and profiling

Date and Time: 
2014 April 8th @ 9:00am
Location: 
CG1 Auditorium
Speaker: 
James Rosinski

In this talk we describe the General Purpose Timing Library (GPTL), an open source tool for instrumenting C, C++, and Fortran codes for performance analysis and profiling. The instrumentation can be inserted manually by the user wherever they wish, or it can be inserted automatically by the compiler at function entry and exit points. In the simplest case, wallclock times are gathered and reported for an arbitrary set of code regions defined by the user.

Speaker Description: 

Jim is currently a Research Associate with CIRA, supporting atmospheric model development at NOAA. Previously, he was a software engineer in CGD at NCAR. He has also worked in various positions in industry, as well as Oak Ridge National Lab.

Event Category:

Using the Eclipse Parallel Tools Platform in Support of Earth Sciences High Performance Computing

Date and Time: 
2014 April 8th @ 9:30am
Location: 
CG1 Auditorium
Speaker: 
Jay Alameda

Using the Eclipse Parallel Tools Platform in Support of Earth Sciences High Performance Computing Eclipse [1] is a widely used, open source integrated development environment that includes support for C, C++, Fortran, and Python. The Parallel Tools Platform (PTP) [2] extends Eclipse to support development on high performance computers. PTP allows the user to run Eclipse on her laptop, while the code is compiled, run, debugged, and profiled on a remote high performance computing (HPC) system.

Speaker Description: 

Jay Alameda is the lead for Advanced Application Support at the National Center for Supercomputing Applications. In this role, he works with the Extreme Science and Engineering Discovery Environment (XSEDE) which is a collaboration of NSF-funded high performance computing (HPC) resource providers, working to provide a common set of services, including the provisioning of advanced user support, to the science and engineering community. In particular, Jay leads the Extended Support for Training, Education, and Outreach Service of XSEDE, which provides the technical expertise to support Training, Education, and Outreach activities organized by XSEDE. Jay also works with the NSF-funded Track 1 project, Blue Waters, and in this role, has worked with advanced development tools (such as the Eclipse Parallel Tools Platform) to support development and optimization of HPC applications on the Blue Waters resource. He is also leading the NSF funded SI2 project, “A Productive and Accessible Development Workbench for HPC Applications Using the Eclipse Parallel Tools Platform”, which is working on a user- and application-centric plan to improve Eclipse PTP as a platform for development of HPC applications, with a particular focus on broadening support of a diverse range of HPC resources (especially across XSEDE) as well as undertaking a broad education, outreach and training agenda to increase the size of the community benefiting from the capabilities of Eclipse PTP.

Event Category:

High Performance Extreme Computing/Data Processing and Visualization

Date and Time: 
2014 April 8th @ 10:45am
Location: 
CG1 Auditorium
Speaker: 
Si Liu

Stampede at the Texas Advanced Computing Center (TACC) is one of the most powerful high performance computing systems in the world for open science research, and Weather Research and Forecasting Model (WRF) is a parallel mesoscale weather model widely used for research, forecasts, and super computer benchmarking. In this project, TACC, Raytheon, and NCAR conducted a highly localized WRF simulation on Stampede for a nested domain centered at Chicago’s O’Hare international Airport. We have obtained an unprecedentedly high resolution and utilized Stampede to the extreme in many aspects.

Speaker Description: 

Si Liu received his PhD in applied mathematics at University of Colorado at Boulder in 2009. His PhD research focused on parallel domain decomposition algorithms for inverse elliptic problems.

During 2009-2013, Si worked as a software engineer in Computational Information Systems Laboratory (CISL) at the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR). He provided consulting services and technical support to scientific computing communities, and collaborated with scientists on models development and optimization. He also participated in establishing the Yellowstone supercomputer in the NCAR-Wyoming Supercomputing Center (NWSC) for climate research.

Si joined the High Performance Computing Group at the Texas Advanced Computing Center (TACC) as a Research Associate in 2013. He is now collaborating with UT research groups, XSEDE community, and many corporations. His current research interests include parallel computing, IO performance, test management, benchmark, and optimization.

Event Category:

Using Python dictionaries to generate coupled model diagnostics

Date and Time: 
2014 April 7th @ 3:15pm
Location: 
CG1 Auditorium
Speaker: 
Ernesto Munoz

To assess CESM coupled model development each CESM model component has a set of “standard” diagnostics that are extracted from the component's model data file. These diagnostic packages process dozens of fields and produce many plots and tables. It is therefore helpful for the software developer who develops or maintains these diagnostic scripts to minimize the reliance on field-specific coding and instead maximize the use of plot-type coding.

Speaker Description: 

Dr. Ernesto Munoz is Associate Scientist in NCAR's Climate and Global Dynamics Division. His current focus is on the development of applications for the analysis of ocean biogeochemistry (in collaboration with Dr. Keith Lindsay). Ernesto was awarded a Ph.D. degree in Atmospheric and Oceanic Sciences from the University of Maryland at College Park. After graduation, he completed a Postdoctoral appointment at NOAA's Cooperative Institute for Marine and Atmospheric Studies.

Event Category:

Post-processing analysis of climate simulation data using python and MPI

Date and Time: 
2014 April 7th @ 3:45pm
Location: 
CG1 Auditorium
Speaker: 
John Dennis

Advances in software parallelism and high-performance systems have resulted in an order of magnitude increase in the volume of output data produced by the Community Earth System Model (CESM). While the volume of data produced by CESM has increased, the parallelism within the post-processing workflow has not keep pace. We describe preliminary work to accelerate the post-processing using Python, MPI, and pyNGL.

Speaker Description: 

TBD

Event Category:

Support and Utilization of the National Weather Service Advanced Weather Interactive Processing System II in a Research Environment

Date and Time: 
2014 April 8th @ 11:15am
Location: 
CG1 Auditorium
Speaker: 
Debra Molenar

RAMMB/CIRA researchers develop simulated GOES-R satellite products for distribution to National Weather Service (NWS) Forecast Offices as part of the advanced satellite application training program of the GOES-R Proving Ground. Operational deployment of the NWS Advanced Weather Interactive Processing System II (AWIPS II) is proceeding in Weather Service Forecast Offices and National Centers throughout the U.S. The standalone version of AWIPS II has been modified to support the RAMMB/CIRA research environment.

Speaker Description: 

Debra Molenar, IT Specialist, NOAA/NESDIS/Regional and Mesoscale Meteorology Branch

Debra Molenar has 30 years of experience supporting software development in a meteorological research environment. The NESDIS Regional and Mesoscale Meteorology Branch (RAMMB) is co-located with the Colorado State University Atmospheric Science Department and the Cooperative Institute for Research in the Atmosphere (CIRA) in Fort Collins, CO. Debra maintains a computer infrastructure of over 50 Linux workstations which provide tools for researchers developing experimental satellite based weather forecast and analysis products. Products are supported from initial development to operational implementation. Debra also leads the Infrastructure Support team at RAMMB/CIRA. Previous research support experience includes a post at the National Science Foundation McMurdo Base in Antarctica.

Event Category:

Jump-starting the development of coupled climate models with minimal effort using a new communication library

Date and Time: 
2014 April 7th @ 11:15am
Location: 
CG1 Auditorium
Speaker: 
Raffaele Montuoro

In recent years, the increased availability of computational resources has allowed scientists to numerically investigate weather and climate phenomena of growing complexity—both on a regional and global scale—and their mutual interaction by using coupled models that can describe the dynamics of energy, mass, and momentum exchange occurring at the interface of systems (e.g. atmosphere, ocean) traditionally simulated in separate computations. Despite such progress, a remarkable amount of time and expertise remains requisite to developing accurate coupled climate models.

Speaker Description: 

Dr. Raffaele Montuoro is a Research Scientist with the Department of Atmospheric Sciences at Texas A&M University. He joined Texas A&M University in 2004, after working as IT consultant for Eutelsat SA in Paris, France. Dr. Montuoro holds a PhD in Theoretical Chemistry from the Scuola Normale Superiore di Pisa, Italy, and has developed innovative numerical models used for accurate calculations of photoionization phenomena. In 2010, some of his recent work in code optimization has been featured in the national press. Dr. Montuoro is currently collaborating with investigators at Texas A&M and PNNL to create a comprehensive high-resolution coupled regional climate model for simulations over the Atlantic Ocean.

Event Category:

Experiences Developing a Fortran Code Transformer

Date and Time: 
2014 April 8th @ 8:30am
Location: 
CG1 Auditorium
Speaker: 
Paul Madden

The Parallel Preprocessor (ppp), a component of the the Scalable Modeling System (SMS, a parallelization toolkit for Fortran developed at NOAA), translates Fortran code with user-supplied directives into a parallel form, based on MPI, ready for compilation. Initially developed in the early '90s, ppp until recently had less than robust support for Fortran 90 (and beyond), and was in need of an overhaul.

Speaker Description: 

I am a software engineer in the Advanced Computing Section of NOAA's Earth System Research Laboratory, Global Systems Division, via CU Boulder's Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Sciences. My work mainly involves automatic parallelization via language translation, regression-testing infrastructure, build/run automation, and tool support (revision control, profiling, etc.) for scientific-model development.

Event Category:

Testing made easy

Date and Time: 
2014 April 8th @ 1:30pm
Location: 
CG1 Auditorium
Speaker: 
Robert McLay

Incorporating testing as part of a software development project, while always seen as a noble goal, is typically not done in many projects, especially in academic ones. This talk will cover some easy ways to make testing part of projects that do numerical work. Most programs either grow or die. New requirement come in and require refactoring. Testing can make this process easier and even enjoyable.

Speaker Description: 

Doctor Robert McLay received bachelors and masters degree from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and his Ph.D in Engineering Mechanics from The University of Texas at Austin. His research include C++ software development, regression testing, and software tools, all related to large parallel numerical simulation codes. In particular, he has done work in parallel finite-element programs solving incompressible fluid flow and heat transfer.

His interest in software tools and support of HPC programming environments has lead to his development of Lmod, a modern replacement for Environment Modules system. Lmod's major advantages are protect all users from loading incompatible software without hindering experts. This work as lead to an interest in tracking the software usage through the module system.

Event Category:

Code Testing in a Distributed Environment Lesson Learned from a NCAR-Academia Project

Date and Time: 
2014 April 8th @ 2:00pm
Location: 
CG1 Auditorium
Speaker: 
Guido Cervone

Code development in a distributed environment is often associated with challenges due to the geographical constraints, different systems and software development practices. In an academic environment, these problems are paired with a relatively high turn-around of developers with different backgrounds and capabilities. This talk addresses lessons learned relative to code testing of the Analog Ensemble (AnEn) methodology, performed at NCAR and at the Pennsylvania State University.

Speaker Description: 

I am an Associate Professor at the Department of Geography, Institute for CyberScience, GeoVISTA Center The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA

My fields of expertise are geoinformatics, machine learning and remote sensing. My research focuses on the development and application of computational algorithms for the analysis of spatio-temporal remote sensing, numerical modeling and social media “Big Data” related to man-made, technological and environmental hazards. I operate a satellite receiving station for NOAA POES satellites. I received research funding from ONR, DOT, NASA, Italian Ministry of Research and Education, Draper Labs, Stormcenter Communication.

I am a member of the advisory committee of the United National Environmental Programme, division of Disasters and Early Warning Assessment. I am also affiliated faculty in the Research Application Laboratory (RAL) at the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR). In 2013 I received the “Medaglia di Rappresentanza” from the President of the Italian Republic for my work related to the Fukushima crisis. I received the 2013 ISNAAF award. I co-chaired the 2010 SIGSPATIAL Data Mining for Geoinformatics (DMG-10) workshop. I served as the program co-chair for the 2008 and 2009 IEEE International Conference on Data Mining (ICDM) Spatial and Spatio-Temporal Data Mining (SSTDM) workshop.

I authored two edited books, over forty fully refereed articles relative to data mining, remote sensing and environmental hazards. In 2010, I was awarded a US patent for an anomaly detection algorithm. My research on natural hazards was featured on TV news and newspapers, on general interest magazines such as National Geographic, and on international magazines.

Event Category:

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