conference-talk

Python for Wind Energy

Date and Time: 
2015 April 13 @ 2:00pm
Location: 
FL2-1022 Large Auditorium
Speaker: 
Katherine Dykes

Authors: Katherine Dykes, Peter Graf, Rick Damiani, George Scott, Andrew Ning, Yi Guo, Taylor Parsons, Ryan King, and Paul Veers

Speaker Description: 

The NREL NWTC wind energy systems engineering initiative has developed a Python-based analysis platform to leverage its research capabilities toward integrating wind energy engineering and cost models across wind plants. This Wind-Plant Integrated System Design & Engineering Model (WISDEM™) platform captures the important interactions between various subsystems to achieve a better understanding of how to improve system-level performance and achieve system-level cost reductions. This work illustrates a few case studies with WISDEM that focus on the design and analysis of wind turbines and plants at different system levels.

Event Category:

Processing of ensemble simulations in a Python framework: PyEnsembles

Date and Time: 
2015 April 13 @ 11:00am
Location: 
FL2-1022 Large Auditorium
Speaker: 
Ernesto Munoz

Authors: Ernesto Munoz, Emily Becker, Sheri Mickelson  

Speaker Description: 

Dr. Ernesto Munoz is Associate Scientist in NCAR's Climate and Global Dynamics Division. His current focus is on the development of applications for the analysis of ocean biogeochemistry (in collaboration with Dr. Keith Lindsay). Ernesto was awarded a Ph.D. degree in Atmospheric and Oceanic Sciences from the University of Maryland at College Park. After graduation, he completed a Postdoctoral appointment at NOAA's Cooperative Institute for Marine and Atmospheric Studies.

Event Category:

Python Base Scientific Data Analysis Web Application

Date and Time: 
2015 April 13 @ 10:00am
Location: 
FL2-1022 Large Auditorium
Speaker: 
Hannah Keller

Authors: Seogmin Choi, Robert Crimi, Connor Guerrieri, Bo Han, Hannah Keller, Hannah Thomas

Speaker Description: 

Hannah Keller is a senior computer science major at the University of Colorado Boulder and is working on a team of 6 students under the guidance a group of developers at NCAR to create a scientific data analysis web application. Hannah is the team lead for the project, which is a Senior Software Engineering Project as part of the university's degree program. Currently, Hannah also works as a software developer associate at Alteryx, Inc., a strategic analytics software provider, where she works on the core engine team and was integral in developing Alteryx social media integration capabilities. Previously, she attended the University of British Columbia studying Environmental Engineering where she worked as a research assistant to an Environmental Fluid Mechanics Research Associate and co-authored a water quality report for the British Columbia Hydro and Power Authority.

Event Category:

Video recorded: 

If you use a non-flash enabled device, you may download the video here

Light-weight Parallel Python Tools Within the CESM Workflow

Date and Time: 
2015 April 13 @ 9:30am
Location: 
FL2-1022 Large Auditorium
Speaker: 
Sheri Mickelson and Alice Bertini

Authors: Sheri Mickelson, Kevin Paul, Alice Bertini, Dave Brown, John Dennis

Speaker Description: 

Sheri Mickelson is a software engineer in the Application Scalability and Performance Group and the CESM Software Engineering Group at NCAR. Her main interest is in application performance. Currently, she is helping lead the effort to improve the performance of various CESM post-processing tools in order to get ready for CMIP6.

Alice Bertini is a software engineer at NCAR in the CESM Software Engineering Group (CSEG). She is the CESM release coordinator, database programmer and administrator for the CSEG databases, and python programmer integrating light-weight parallel python tools developed by NCAR CISL ASAP group into the CESM workflow post-processing tools.

Event Category:

Video recorded: 

If you use a non-flash enabled device, you may download the video here

Development Tools for Results: Allinea's unified tools for debugging and profiling HPC codes

Date and Time: 
2015 April 15 - FULL DAY
Location: 
FL2-1001 Small Seminar (next to the entrance of the building)
Speaker: 
Beau Paisley

Developing an HPC application can be a challenging task - especially when it comes to fixing bugs, optimizing workload or even resolving both type of issues simultaneously. Those challenges are made easier with Allinea Tools. Using our environment, it is now possible for developers to adopt instantly efficient and scalable development tools and to focus immediately on their core activity - which can be science, benchmarks, support or even more. During this tutorial, we will review the capabilities of Allinea Tools and how to use them on yellowstone.

Speaker Description: 

Beau is a computer science and mathematics graduate from the College of William and Mary and performed graduate studies in Electrical Engineering at Purdue University. Beau has over twenty five years of experience in development, marketing, and sales roles with research, academic, and startup organizations. He has previously held positions with NCAR, Applied Physics Lab, and several startup and early growth technical computing companies. Beau is now a Support Engineer with Allinea Software.

Event Category:

The PyNIO multi-format scientific data I/O module

Date and Time: 
2015 April 16 - AM
Location: 
FL2-1022 Large Auditorium
Speaker: 
David Brown, Wei Huang, Mary Haley and Rick Brownrigg

PyNIO is a Python package that allows read and/or write access to a variety of scientific data formats, including NetCDF 3/4, HDF 4/5, HDFEOS 2/5, GRIB 1/2, and shapefiles. It provides a consistent NetCDF-like data model for all formats and through its interface to the NumPy array module allows for easy access to the power of Python scientific computing tools. In combination with mpi4py it has provided significant speedups for a number of "big data" processing tasks involving climate model data. Significant development to modernize the code is ongoing.

Speaker Description: 

TBD

Event Category:

Introduction to testing with py.test

Date and Time: 
2015 April 15 - PM
Location: 
FL2-1022 Large Auditorium
Speaker: 
Dorota Jarecka

Py.test is a full feature tool to test your Python code. It offers a simple way to get started writing test in your work. Py.test scales from simple unit testing to complex functional testing. It is already widely used in many small and large projects. 
This tutorial will be a short introduction to general testing terminology and py.test tool. It will cover a basic py.test usage, starting from unit testing and the assert statement. Parametrization of arguments for a test function will be presented as a way to test a wide range of arguments’ values at the same time.

Speaker Description: 

Dorota Jarecka is an Assistant Professor at the University of Warsaw (Warsaw, Poland) and a Visitor within the Mesoscale and Microscale Meteorology Division of NCAR. She received her PhD in Physics from University of Warsaw in September 2012. Her research interests include cloud microphysics, atmospheric numerical simulations and scientific computing with Python. She just started a new project dedicated to develop and test microphysical schemes in numerical models.

Event Category:

Packaging Python Projects

Date and Time: 
2015 April 15 - PM
Location: 
FL2-1022 Large Auditorium
Speaker: 
Sean Fisk

Packaging and distribution is essential to the success of open-source Python projects. This tutorial covers the process of turning a simple Python script into a package that can be uploaded to the Python Package Index. In addition to basic and advanced use of distutils and Setuptools, it explores integration of documentation, unit testing, code quality assurance, continuous integration, and Python 2/3 compatibility. By the end of the tutorial, participants will have a full Python package which can be used as a basis for future Python projects.

Speaker Description: 

Sean Fisk is graduate student at Grand Valley State University studying for his Master’s degree in Computer Science. In summer 2013, he was an NCAR intern in the SIParCS program of Computational and Information Systems Laboratory.

Event Category:

Data analysis and visualization using the Python notebook interface

Date and Time: 
2015 April 17 - PM
Location: 
FL2-1022 Large Auditorium
Speaker: 
Ramalingam Saravanan

Computer models and remote sensing missions often generate datasets that are too large to store and analyze on desktop computers or even on local compute clusters. A traditional approach to exploring such datasets is to run the analysis program on a remote machine and display the output on the desktop computer via X windows. The tunneling option of the secure shell connection can be used to facilitate remote display of graphics generated by analysis software like Matlab, IDL, NCL etc.

Speaker Description: 

Saravanan has been a professor in the Department of Atmospheric Sciences at Texas A&M University since 2005. Previously, he worked as a scientist in CGD at NCAR. He received his Ph.D. in Atmospheric and Oceanic Sciences from Princeton University in 1990. His research involves the use of supercomputers for numeric al modeling and data analysis to study past, present, and future climates. He also dabbles in open source software and teaches courses in meteorology, climate, and introductory programming (using Python)

Event Category:

Video recorded: 

Ipython notebook created during the tutorial downloadable from this page (remove the _.txt extension) and visible at http://nbviewer.ipython.org/urls/dl.dropboxusercontent.com/u/72208800/docs/NCAR-SEA15.ipynb

Python in HPC

Date and Time: 
2015 April 17 - AM
Location: 
FL2-1022 Large Auditorium
Speaker: 
Antonio Gomez-Iglesias

The aim of this tutorial is to present an overview of the most useful and important techniques and tools that can be used to efficiently work with Python in HPC. Different tips and approaches that developers can implement to improve the performance of their Python codes will be provided, as well as information on how to take advantage of multicore and distributed programming. This tutorial will also focus on different alternatives for efficiently developing, profiling and running Python codes on Stampede, however, most of the topics covered will be applicable to any other machine.

Speaker Description: 

Antonio joined TACC in 2014 as a Research Associate in the High Performance Group. Previously, he was Postdoctoral Fellow at CSIRO (Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organization) at the Mathematics, Informatics, and Statistics Division, now Computational Informatics, in the Operations Research Group in Clayton, Victoria, Australia. He obtained his PhD in Computer Science in 2011 from the University of Extremadura, Spain, in collaboration with the National Fusion Laboratory, where he worked as Research Project Officer.

Event Category:

Pages

Subscribe to conference-talk