conference-talk

Getting the most out of RT: Library and REST API Development

Date and Time: 
2014 April 8th @ 4:15pm
Location: 
CG1 Auditorium
Speaker: 
Carrie Arnold

Software projects, both large and small, benefit from relying on an issue tracking system to manage and maintain a central and up to date list of project features and bugs. Ticketing systems have become a fundamental component in large eScience projects and advanced computing institutes to keep track of user issues and requests. Projects such as XSEDE and Blue Waters and advanced computing centers such as TACC, use Request Tracker (RT) as a help desk ticketing system for issue tracking.

Speaker Description: 

Carrie Arnold is a developer in the Web and Mobile Applications group at the Texas Advanced Computing Center (TACC) at The University of Texas at Austin. Her diverse programming background has her working on multiple projects spanning development in Drupal, Java, and Liferay portal development.

Event Category:

Productivity-oriented software design for geoscientific modelling

Date and Time: 
2014 April 7th @ 2:00pm
Location: 
CG1 Auditorium
Speaker: 
Dorota Jarecka

Researchers' productivity in computational science is increasingly determined by software quality. From the users' perspective it means: ease of use, robustness, result reproducibility. From the developers' perspective it means extendability and maintainability. In our community, many researchers are users and developers alike.

Speaker Description: 

Dorota Jarecka is an Assistant Professor at the University of Warsaw (Warsaw, Poland) and a Visitor within the Mesoscale and Microscale Meteorology Division of NCAR. She received her PhD in Physics from University of Warsaw in September 2012. Her research interests include cloud microphysics, atmospheric numerical simulations and scientific computing with Python. She just started a new project dedicated to develop and test microphysical schemes in numerical models.

Event Category:

DevOps in the Data Center

Date and Time: 
2014 April 7th @ 8:30am
Location: 
CG1 Auditorium
Speaker: 
Rion Dooley

The Agave Developer APIs are a hosted, cloud-based collection of REST APIs bringing HPC, HTC, and Big Data to the web. One of the challenges in providing hosted software is designing and maturing our devops infrastructure to give us, at the same time, highly accurate monitoring, useful logging, continuous integration and continuous deployment, and a scalable infrastructure that can be quickly stood up or torn down based on demand. This talk focuses on the successes and learning moments we had trying to "get stuff working" and "keep stuff working" reliably.

Speaker Description: 

Rion Dooley is a research associate at the Texas Advanced Computing where he leads the Web and Cloud Services group. He earned his Ph.D. in CS from LSU in 2004 with the support of a Board of Regents Fellowship. He worked at LSU's Center of Computation and Technology for 2 years before moving to UT. Past projects include the development of science gateways such as GridChem, the TeraGrid mobile user portal, and the XSEDE user portal. Rion is currently the lead architect of the Agave API, and co-PI of the Distributed Web Security for Science Gateways project. He is also a senior participant in the Science Gateway Institute planning project. Rion's primary research interests include distributed systems, cloud infrastructure, and data management.

Event Category:

Designing and Building Awesome REST APIs That Get Used

Date and Time: 
2014 April 8th @ 3:45pm
Location: 
CG1 Auditorium
Speaker: 
Rion Dooley

Everyone loves a great app, but how many of us have stopped to consider the role the supporting APIs played in making the app great. Your choice of APIs can make or break a project. And, as developers and service providers, the design and development of your own APIs can make or break the projects of the people attempting to leverage your resources. In this talk, we walk through what goes into designing and building an awesome REST API that gets used.

Speaker Description: 

Rion Dooley is a research associate at the Texas Advanced Computing where he leads the Web and Cloud Services group. He earned his Ph.D. in CS from LSU in 2004 with the support of a Board of Regents Fellowship. He worked at LSU's Center of Computation and Technology for 2 years before moving to UT. Past projects include the development of science gateways such as GridChem, the TeraGrid mobile user portal, and the XSEDE user portal. Rion is currently the lead architect of the Agave API, and co-PI of the Distributed Web Security for Science Gateways project. He is also a senior participant in the Science Gateway Institute planning project. Rion's primary research interests include distributed systems, cloud infrastructure, and data management.

Event Category:

Agent Based Modeling in HPC

Date and Time: 
2014 April 8th @ 10:15am
Location: 
CG1 Auditorium
Speaker: 
Mike Page

In this talk, I will offer a definition of Agent Based Modeling (ABM), review a list of software tools used to conduct ABM, discuss some ABM application areas and present some results from the field. I will also show how one ABM tool (FLAME) has made the transition from serial execution to a large-scale, distributed memory hardware environment. This will lead to a call for ABM studies of large populations in social and computational sciences.

Speaker Description: 

Mike Page is currently an HPC Software Analyst seeking contract opportunities under the name 'Theory and Practice’. His career in HPC has spanned from the time he worked for Cray Research, Inc. He was a Software Engineer in NCAR’s CISL and then RAL from 2003 to 2012.

Theory and Practice offers HPC application support and optimization services.

Mike gave his first presentation centered on agent-based modeling at a UN conference on the Human Dimensions of Global Environmental Change in Potsdam, Germany in 2005 near the building where the Michelson-Morley experiments on the speed of light were performed.

Event Category:

OAuth in the Agave Platform

Date and Time: 
2014 April 8th @ 3:15pm
Location: 
CG1 Auditorium
Speaker: 
Joe Stubbs

The OAuth specification provides a powerful and secure framework for delegating access to sensitive data and resources over the web. Version 2 was published in October of 2012 and has seen wide adoption from industry leaders like Google, Facebook and Twitter. In this talk we will present an overview of OAuth 2 and its uses. We'll then discuss how we built support for OAuth2 into Agave, our 'science as a service' platform. In concert with other technologies like MyProxy and GSI security, we'll show how OAuth and Agave can significantly simplify the challenges of bringing HPC to the web.

Speaker Description: 

Joe Stubbs earned a PhD in Mathematics from the University of Michigan. Since then he has been at the University of Texas where he has focused on building infrastructure software in various contexts. He is currently a research scientist at TACC where he primarily works on the Agave "science as a service" platform, enabling the next generation of science gateways to harness petascale HPC over the web.

Event Category:

Python Tools for Parallel Analysis of Extremely Large GCM Output

Date and Time: 
2014 April 11th @ 1pm
Location: 
CG - room TBD
Speaker: 
Ryan Abernathey

Ocean General Circulation Models (GCMs) are resolving finer and finer scales, meaning that the size of the computational domain is growing rapidly. While the parallel achitecture of GCM codes themselves scales well, the typical tools we use to analyze the output (where the actual science happens) do not. I will report on a toolkit I am developing for the parallel analysis of extremely large global GCM simulations (https://github.com/rabernat/MITgcm_parallel_analysis).

Speaker Description: 

Assistant Professor of Earth and Environmental Sciences @ Columbia University / Lamont Doherty Earth Observatory

prevously: Postdoc at Scripps Institution of Oceanographu Ph.D. in Climate Physics and Chemistry at MIT

interests: Global ocean circulation, mesoscale eddy dynamics, transport and mixing in turbulent flows

Event Category:

Best Practices: Testing Node.js for Stability and Project Success

Date and Time: 
2014 April 7th @ 9:00am
Location: 
CG1 Auditorium
Speaker: 
Walter Scarborough

The Texas Advanced Computing Center (TACC) uses node.js in middleware services that gather HPC metrics, as well as for customizing and wrapping backend APIs that include the Agave API for science­as­a­platform development. Node.js has become a popular choice for developing backend and middleware services. However, node’s asynchronous nature can make projects that use it difficult to maintain unless consistent testing practices are followed. There are a variety of testing hurdles at the technical level including layers of callbacks, dependency web services and authentication.

Speaker Description: 

Walter Scarborough is a software developer at the Texas Advanced Computing Center (TACC) at the University of Texas at Austin. He focuses on mobile applications and services.

Event Category:

Collective Mind: a collaborative curation tool for program optimization

Date and Time: 
2014 April 8th @ 11:45am
Location: 
CG1 Auditorium
Speaker: 
Grigori Fursin

Designing and optimizing applications becomes increasingly tedious, time consuming, ad-hoc and error prone due to ever changing and complex hardware and software stack. At the same time, it becomes difficult or even impossible to validate, reproduce and extend many proposed optimization and auto-tuning techniques from numerous publications. One of the main reasons is a lack of common and practical way to preserve, systematize and reuse available knowledge and artifacts including developments, optimizations and experimental data.

Speaker Description: 

Grigori Fursin is a tenured research scientist at INRIA. He is a founder of cTuning.org and Collective Mind project for collaborative, systematic and reproducible program optimization and run-time adaptation combined with machine learning and data mining. Grigori is always interested to move his technology to industry and currently collaborates with ARM, STMicroelectronics, Google and several other companies.

Event Category:

Lessons Learned from the Deployment and Integration of a Microwave Sounder Based Tropical Cyclone Intensity and Surface Wind Estimation Algorithm into NOAA/NESDIS Satellite Product Operations

Date and Time: 
2014 April 7th @ 11:45am
Location: 
CG1 Auditorium
Speaker: 
Scott Longmore

The Colorado State University (CSU) Cooperative Institute for Research in the Atmosphere (CIRA) has recently deployed a tropical cyclone (TC) intensity and surface wind radii estimation algorithm that utilizes Suomi National Polar-orbiting Partnership (S-NPP) satellite Advanced Technology Microwave Sounder (ATMS) and Advanced Microwave Sounding Unit (AMSU) from the NOAA18, NOAA19 and METOPA polar orbiting satellites for testing, integration and operations for the Product System Development and Implementation (PSDI) projects at NOAA’s National Environmental Satellite, Data, and Information S

Speaker Description: 

Scott Longmore is a research associate and software engineer at the Cooperative Institute for Research in the Atmosphere at Colorado State University, where his core responsibilities are developing and migrating CIRA atmospheric science algorithms and products into National Weather Service operations.

Event Category:

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