conference-talk

Python Disdrometer Processing: From Prototyping to Library Development Using Open Source Tooling

Date and Time: 
2014 April 7th @ 4:15pm
Location: 
CG1 Auditorium
Speaker: 
Joseph Hardin

A common instrument utilized in the atmospheric sciences is the disdrometer. This instrument gives a count of the numbers of different size drops that pass through it's sensor area. This talk will cover the development of a Python disdrometer and rain gauge library using open source tools focusing on the tooling, with the actual library as a motivating need.

Speaker Description: 

Joseph Hardin is an electrical engineering Ph.D. student at Colorado State University studying radar engineering. His current research area is radar network microphysical retrievals. He is also currently the maintainer of the VCHILL radar data visualization program. Before CSU he received his M.S. in electrical engineering from New Mexico State University for work on audio compression quality metrics and computational neuroscience.

Event Category:

Test-Driven Development of Scientific Software

Date and Time: 
2014 April 8th @ 2:30pm
Location: 
CG1 Auditorium
Speaker: 
Thomas Clune

The software development process known as test-driven development (TDD) promises many advantages for developer productivity and software reliability and has become widely accepted among professional software engineers. As the name suggests, TDD alternates in phases between writing short automated tests and producing code to pass those tests.

Speaker Description: 

Thomas Clune, Ph.D., Chief, Software Systems Support Office, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, and a principle developer of pFUnit.

Event Category:

Continuous Integration and Delivery at NSIDC

Date and Time: 
2014 April 7th @ 10:15am
Location: 
CG1 Auditorium
Speaker: 
Julia Collins

The National Snow and Ice Data Center (NSIDC) currently uses Jenkins, an open source continuous integration server, to manage the build and deployment steps for our production applications. Evolving development and integration models (such as using git feature branches) and the increasing number of applications have made it difficult to scale our build configurations.

Speaker Description: 

I am a Web Applications Developer at the National Snow and Ice Data Center at the University of Colorado, Boulder. My focus is on the application of Informatics concepts and practices to the management of Earth science data.

Event Category:

GPTL: A simple and free general purpose tool for performance analysis and profiling

Date and Time: 
2014 April 8th @ 9:00am
Location: 
CG1 Auditorium
Speaker: 
James Rosinski

In this talk we describe the General Purpose Timing Library (GPTL), an open source tool for instrumenting C, C++, and Fortran codes for performance analysis and profiling. The instrumentation can be inserted manually by the user wherever they wish, or it can be inserted automatically by the compiler at function entry and exit points. In the simplest case, wallclock times are gathered and reported for an arbitrary set of code regions defined by the user.

Speaker Description: 

Jim is currently a Research Associate with CIRA, supporting atmospheric model development at NOAA. Previously, he was a software engineer in CGD at NCAR. He has also worked in various positions in industry, as well as Oak Ridge National Lab.

Event Category:

Using the Eclipse Parallel Tools Platform in Support of Earth Sciences High Performance Computing

Date and Time: 
2014 April 8th @ 9:30am
Location: 
CG1 Auditorium
Speaker: 
Jay Alameda

Using the Eclipse Parallel Tools Platform in Support of Earth Sciences High Performance Computing Eclipse [1] is a widely used, open source integrated development environment that includes support for C, C++, Fortran, and Python. The Parallel Tools Platform (PTP) [2] extends Eclipse to support development on high performance computers. PTP allows the user to run Eclipse on her laptop, while the code is compiled, run, debugged, and profiled on a remote high performance computing (HPC) system.

Speaker Description: 

Jay Alameda is the lead for Advanced Application Support at the National Center for Supercomputing Applications. In this role, he works with the Extreme Science and Engineering Discovery Environment (XSEDE) which is a collaboration of NSF-funded high performance computing (HPC) resource providers, working to provide a common set of services, including the provisioning of advanced user support, to the science and engineering community. In particular, Jay leads the Extended Support for Training, Education, and Outreach Service of XSEDE, which provides the technical expertise to support Training, Education, and Outreach activities organized by XSEDE. Jay also works with the NSF-funded Track 1 project, Blue Waters, and in this role, has worked with advanced development tools (such as the Eclipse Parallel Tools Platform) to support development and optimization of HPC applications on the Blue Waters resource. He is also leading the NSF funded SI2 project, “A Productive and Accessible Development Workbench for HPC Applications Using the Eclipse Parallel Tools Platform”, which is working on a user- and application-centric plan to improve Eclipse PTP as a platform for development of HPC applications, with a particular focus on broadening support of a diverse range of HPC resources (especially across XSEDE) as well as undertaking a broad education, outreach and training agenda to increase the size of the community benefiting from the capabilities of Eclipse PTP.

Event Category:

High Performance Extreme Computing/Data Processing and Visualization

Date and Time: 
2014 April 8th @ 10:45am
Location: 
CG1 Auditorium
Speaker: 
Si Liu

Stampede at the Texas Advanced Computing Center (TACC) is one of the most powerful high performance computing systems in the world for open science research, and Weather Research and Forecasting Model (WRF) is a parallel mesoscale weather model widely used for research, forecasts, and super computer benchmarking. In this project, TACC, Raytheon, and NCAR conducted a highly localized WRF simulation on Stampede for a nested domain centered at Chicago’s O’Hare international Airport. We have obtained an unprecedentedly high resolution and utilized Stampede to the extreme in many aspects.

Speaker Description: 

Si Liu received his PhD in applied mathematics at University of Colorado at Boulder in 2009. His PhD research focused on parallel domain decomposition algorithms for inverse elliptic problems.

During 2009-2013, Si worked as a software engineer in Computational Information Systems Laboratory (CISL) at the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR). He provided consulting services and technical support to scientific computing communities, and collaborated with scientists on models development and optimization. He also participated in establishing the Yellowstone supercomputer in the NCAR-Wyoming Supercomputing Center (NWSC) for climate research.

Si joined the High Performance Computing Group at the Texas Advanced Computing Center (TACC) as a Research Associate in 2013. He is now collaborating with UT research groups, XSEDE community, and many corporations. His current research interests include parallel computing, IO performance, test management, benchmark, and optimization.

Event Category:

Using Python dictionaries to generate coupled model diagnostics

Date and Time: 
2014 April 7th @ 3:15pm
Location: 
CG1 Auditorium
Speaker: 
Ernesto Munoz

To assess CESM coupled model development each CESM model component has a set of “standard” diagnostics that are extracted from the component's model data file. These diagnostic packages process dozens of fields and produce many plots and tables. It is therefore helpful for the software developer who develops or maintains these diagnostic scripts to minimize the reliance on field-specific coding and instead maximize the use of plot-type coding.

Speaker Description: 

Dr. Ernesto Munoz is Associate Scientist in NCAR's Climate and Global Dynamics Division. His current focus is on the development of applications for the analysis of ocean biogeochemistry (in collaboration with Dr. Keith Lindsay). Ernesto was awarded a Ph.D. degree in Atmospheric and Oceanic Sciences from the University of Maryland at College Park. After graduation, he completed a Postdoctoral appointment at NOAA's Cooperative Institute for Marine and Atmospheric Studies.

Event Category:

Post-processing analysis of climate simulation data using python and MPI

Date and Time: 
2014 April 7th @ 3:45pm
Location: 
CG1 Auditorium
Speaker: 
John Dennis

Advances in software parallelism and high-performance systems have resulted in an order of magnitude increase in the volume of output data produced by the Community Earth System Model (CESM). While the volume of data produced by CESM has increased, the parallelism within the post-processing workflow has not keep pace. We describe preliminary work to accelerate the post-processing using Python, MPI, and pyNGL.

Speaker Description: 

TBD

Event Category:

Support and Utilization of the National Weather Service Advanced Weather Interactive Processing System II in a Research Environment

Date and Time: 
2014 April 8th @ 11:15am
Location: 
CG1 Auditorium
Speaker: 
Debra Molenar

RAMMB/CIRA researchers develop simulated GOES-R satellite products for distribution to National Weather Service (NWS) Forecast Offices as part of the advanced satellite application training program of the GOES-R Proving Ground. Operational deployment of the NWS Advanced Weather Interactive Processing System II (AWIPS II) is proceeding in Weather Service Forecast Offices and National Centers throughout the U.S. The standalone version of AWIPS II has been modified to support the RAMMB/CIRA research environment.

Speaker Description: 

Debra Molenar, IT Specialist, NOAA/NESDIS/Regional and Mesoscale Meteorology Branch

Debra Molenar has 30 years of experience supporting software development in a meteorological research environment. The NESDIS Regional and Mesoscale Meteorology Branch (RAMMB) is co-located with the Colorado State University Atmospheric Science Department and the Cooperative Institute for Research in the Atmosphere (CIRA) in Fort Collins, CO. Debra maintains a computer infrastructure of over 50 Linux workstations which provide tools for researchers developing experimental satellite based weather forecast and analysis products. Products are supported from initial development to operational implementation. Debra also leads the Infrastructure Support team at RAMMB/CIRA. Previous research support experience includes a post at the National Science Foundation McMurdo Base in Antarctica.

Event Category:

Jump-starting the development of coupled climate models with minimal effort using a new communication library

Date and Time: 
2014 April 7th @ 11:15am
Location: 
CG1 Auditorium
Speaker: 
Raffaele Montuoro

In recent years, the increased availability of computational resources has allowed scientists to numerically investigate weather and climate phenomena of growing complexity—both on a regional and global scale—and their mutual interaction by using coupled models that can describe the dynamics of energy, mass, and momentum exchange occurring at the interface of systems (e.g. atmosphere, ocean) traditionally simulated in separate computations. Despite such progress, a remarkable amount of time and expertise remains requisite to developing accurate coupled climate models.

Speaker Description: 

Dr. Raffaele Montuoro is a Research Scientist with the Department of Atmospheric Sciences at Texas A&M University. He joined Texas A&M University in 2004, after working as IT consultant for Eutelsat SA in Paris, France. Dr. Montuoro holds a PhD in Theoretical Chemistry from the Scuola Normale Superiore di Pisa, Italy, and has developed innovative numerical models used for accurate calculations of photoionization phenomena. In 2010, some of his recent work in code optimization has been featured in the national press. Dr. Montuoro is currently collaborating with investigators at Texas A&M and PNNL to create a comprehensive high-resolution coupled regional climate model for simulations over the Atlantic Ocean.

Event Category:

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