conference-talk

Basics of NetCDF File I/O in Python

Date and Time: 
2015 April 16 - AM
Location: 
FL2 - room TBD
Speaker: 
Johnny Lin

The basics of reading and writing netCDF files using Python's netCDF4 package.

Download slides, datasets, code files, etc 

Speaker Description: 

Johnny Lin graduated from Stanford University with a B.S. in Mechanical Engineering and an M.S. in Civil Engineering-Water Resources. After working as an environmental engineer, he returned to school and received his Ph.D. in Atmospheric Sciences from UCLA, as a student of David Neelin.  His atmospheric science research is focused on stochastic convective parameterizations, ice-atmosphere interactions in the Arctic, and simple frameworks for modularizing climate models.

He is also working on a book on environmental ethics and helps coordinate the PyAOS mailing list and blog (pyaos.johnny-lin.com), an effort at building up the atmospheric and oceanic sciences Python community. Currently he is Senior Lecturer and Director of Undergraduate Computing Education at University of Washington, Bothell

Event Category:

Python Performance Evaulation with the TAU Performance System

Date and Time: 
2015 April 16 - AM
Location: 
FL2-1001 Small Seminar (next to the entrance of the building)
Speaker: 
John Linford

The TAU Performance System is a powerful and highly versatile profiling and tracing tool ecosystem for performance analysis of parallel programs at all scales. Developed for almost two decades, TAU has evolved with each new generation of HPC systems and presently scales efficiently to hundreds of thousands of cores on the largest machines in the world. TAU has helped many projects scale up successfully on systems at Oak Ridge Leadership Computing Facility (OLCF), the National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center (NERSC), the Argonne Leadership Computing Facility (ALCF), and others.

Speaker Description: 

Dr. John Linford is a Scientist at ParaTools, Inc. He received his Ph.D. from Virginia Tech, where his dissertation on accelerating atmospheric modeling through emerging multi-core technologies was selected as the outstanding doctoral dissertation of 2010. John has developed a meta-programmer for chemical kinetic simulation, airborne signal processing applications, rotocraft engineering tools, and toolkits for porting parallel HPC applications to cloud computing platforms. John helps develop the TAU Performance System and has contributed to the Scalasca project and the MoinMoin project.

Event Category:

Dynamic data structures and first-class citizens: Python features that can make modeling more flexible and powerful

Date and Time: 
2015 April 15 - AM
Location: 
FL2-1022 Large Auditorium
Speaker: 
Johnny Lin

Python works great as a traditional procedural language, and in that mode, can do all the atmospheric and oceanic sciences work we desire. But if we use just a few more of its features---dynamic data structures like dictionaries and how any object (even functions) have the same status---we can make our models more flexible and powerful and create modeling experiments that would otherwise be difficult to do.

Download slides, datasets, code files, etc 

Speaker Description: 

Johnny Lin graduated from Stanford University with a B.S. in Mechanical Engineering and an M.S. in Civil Engineering-Water Resources. After working as an environmental engineer, he returned to school and received his Ph.D. in Atmospheric Sciences from UCLA, as a student of David Neelin.  His atmospheric science research is focused on stochastic convective parameterizations, ice-atmosphere interactions in the Arctic, and simple frameworks for modularizing climate models.

He is also working on a book on environmental ethics and helps coordinate the PyAOS mailing list and blog (pyaos.johnny-lin.com), an effort at building up the atmospheric and oceanic sciences Python community. Currently he is Senior Lecturer and Director of Undergraduate Computing Education at University of Washington, Bothell

Event Category:

Dynamic data structures and first-class citizens: Python features that can make data analysis more flexible and powerful

Date and Time: 
2015 April 15 - AM
Location: 
FL2-1022 Large Auditorium
Speaker: 
Johnny Lin

Python works great as a traditional procedural language, and in that mode, can do all the atmospheric and oceanic sciences work we desire. But if we use just a few more of its features---dynamic data structures like dictionaries and how any object (even functions) have the same status---we can make our data analysis code substantially more flexible and powerful.

Speaker Description: 

Johnny Lin graduated from Stanford University with a B.S. in Mechanical Engineering and an M.S. in Civil Engineering-Water Resources. After working as an environmental engineer, he returned to school and received his Ph.D. in Atmospheric Sciences from UCLA, as a student of David Neelin.  His atmospheric science research is focused on stochastic convective parameterizations, ice-atmosphere interactions in the Arctic, and simple frameworks for modularizing climate models.

He is also working on a book on environmental ethics and helps coordinate the PyAOS mailing list and blog (pyaos.johnny-lin.com), an effort at building up the atmospheric and oceanic sciences Python community. Currently he is Senior Lecturer and Director of Undergraduate Computing Education at University of Washington, Bothell

Event Category:

git@github.com/ncareol

Date and Time: 
2014 April 7th @ 2:30pm
Location: 
CG1 Auditorium
Speaker: 
Erik Johnson

For the last two and a half years, the CTM Group at NCAR's Earth Observing Laboratory (EOL) has consolidated its Git-based workflow around repositories hosted at GitHub and the tools that GitHub provides w/ those repositories. This talk will briefly introduce GitHub and the EOL Field-Catalog web and database applications, for contextual background, and then present how we've used Git and GitHub to enhance and streamline our development process and workflow. I will present how we use the following topics, and their benefits, costs and lessons learned:

Speaker Description: 

Erik Johnson is a software engineer at NCAR's Earth Observing Laboratory, responsible for full-stack web development and devops for the Field Catalog and related Catalog tools using Free and Open-Source technologies. Erik has previously worked at start-ups and contracted to NOAA and NASA.

Erik earned a BS in Physics with Departmental Honors from Truman State University and a MS in Physics from West Virginia University.

Event Category:

A Method for Creating and Maintaining an Inventory of an Institution's Scientific Data

Date and Time: 
2014 April 7th @ 1:30pm
Location: 
CG1 Auditorium
Speaker: 
James Fluke

Institutions are archiving ever-increasing volumes of data for research. For institutions where data sets are brought in by separate research groups and hosted in stovepipe systems it is likely that many of those data sets could benefit the work of other groups if they are sharable, discoverable, and made accessible. This presentation describes a software project meant to address this issue in progress at CIRA. The software creates and maintains an inventory of the various data archives available at the CIRA Fort Collins campus.

Speaker Description: 

Jim is a computer programmer with the CIRA CloudSat Data Processing Center. Currently, he is helping to explore the software needs of a possible CIRA Data Processing Center, and working on ways to improve Configuration Management for the CloudSat DPC.

Previously, he worked for CIRA at Boulder in association with NOAA’s Global Systems Division where he worked on AWIPS 1 and AWIPS 2.

He received his BA in Chemistry from the University of Northern Colorado (1978), and MS (1982) in Biochemistry from the University of California, Riverside. His experience includes over 25 years experience in computer programming, and over 20 years experience in hydrometeorological display and user interface programming.

Event Category:

Virtual Goodness with Virtual Machines

Date and Time: 
2014 April 7th @ 10:45am
Location: 
CG1 Auditorium
Speaker: 
Kevin Beam

The National Snow and Ice Data Center (NSIDC) recently deployed a scientific visualization web application that made use of a new Virtual Machine (VM) infrastructure at the Center. The team used tools like Vagrant, VirtualBox, VMware's vSphere, Puppet, Fabric, and Jenkins to automate the creation and provisioning of VMs in various environments (local workstations, integration, QA, staging, and production). In this talk we will discuss why VMs were useful for this project, what tools we used, and ideas for using VMs on future projects.

Speaker Description: 

Kevin Beam is a software engineer at the National Snow and Ice Data Center (NSIDC) at the University of Colorado, Boulder. He enjoys applying Python, test-driven development, and functional programming to scientific software development.

Kevin will be collaborating with NSIDC colleagues Matt Savoie, Hannah Wilcox, and Jeff Braucher on this talk.

Event Category:

Python Disdrometer Processing: From Prototyping to Library Development Using Open Source Tooling

Date and Time: 
2014 April 7th @ 4:15pm
Location: 
CG1 Auditorium
Speaker: 
Joseph Hardin

A common instrument utilized in the atmospheric sciences is the disdrometer. This instrument gives a count of the numbers of different size drops that pass through it's sensor area. This talk will cover the development of a Python disdrometer and rain gauge library using open source tools focusing on the tooling, with the actual library as a motivating need.

Speaker Description: 

Joseph Hardin is an electrical engineering Ph.D. student at Colorado State University studying radar engineering. His current research area is radar network microphysical retrievals. He is also currently the maintainer of the VCHILL radar data visualization program. Before CSU he received his M.S. in electrical engineering from New Mexico State University for work on audio compression quality metrics and computational neuroscience.

Event Category:

Test-Driven Development of Scientific Software

Date and Time: 
2014 April 8th @ 2:30pm
Location: 
CG1 Auditorium
Speaker: 
Thomas Clune

The software development process known as test-driven development (TDD) promises many advantages for developer productivity and software reliability and has become widely accepted among professional software engineers. As the name suggests, TDD alternates in phases between writing short automated tests and producing code to pass those tests.

Speaker Description: 

Thomas Clune, Ph.D., Chief, Software Systems Support Office, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, and a principle developer of pFUnit.

Event Category:

Continuous Integration and Delivery at NSIDC

Date and Time: 
2014 April 7th @ 10:15am
Location: 
CG1 Auditorium
Speaker: 
Julia Collins

The National Snow and Ice Data Center (NSIDC) currently uses Jenkins, an open source continuous integration server, to manage the build and deployment steps for our production applications. Evolving development and integration models (such as using git feature branches) and the increasing number of applications have made it difficult to scale our build configurations.

Speaker Description: 

I am a Web Applications Developer at the National Snow and Ice Data Center at the University of Colorado, Boulder. My focus is on the application of Informatics concepts and practices to the management of Earth science data.

Event Category:

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