conference-talk

Big Data from CESM - Past, Present and the near Future

Date and Time: 
Monday, April 4th, 2016
Location: 
Center Green
Speaker: 
Gary Strand

The Community Earth System Model (CESM) has been in the realm of "big data" since before it became a buzzword. I'll talk about past experiences with big data (primarily CMIP5), and the lessons learned from those experiences. Those lessons, which have informed and improved big data practices within CESM since that time, will be discussed as well as the preparations being made for the upcoming CMIP6. I'll also mention the various aspects of good data management and how the CESM project is addressing them.

Speaker Description: 

Gary Strand is a software engineer who has become the *de facto* data manager and sometime data scientists for the CESM project.

Event Category:

Welcoming remarks

Date and Time: 
2015 April 13 @ 9:15am
Location: 
FL2-1022 Large Auditorium
Speaker: 
Jim Hurrel
Speaker Description: 

Jim Hurrell is the Director of NCAR.

Event Category:

Video recorded: 

If you use a non-flash enabled device, you may download the video here

Project Jupyter: a language-independent architecture for open computing and data science

Date and Time: 
2015 April 13 @ 9:30am
Location: 
FL2-1022 Large Auditorium
Speaker: 
Fernando Perez

IPython began its life in Boulder in 2001, as an environment for interactive scientific computing and data analysis, motivated by my needs as a physics graduate student. Over the years, it evolved into one of the main elements of the collaboratively developed ecosystem of open source tools for science in Python. In recent years, IPython has evolved into Project Jupyter: an architecture that takes the foundations of IPython and extends them to any programming language. Jupyter offers interactive terminals as well as a popular web-based notebook environment.

Speaker Description: 

Fernando Pérez (@fperez_org) is a staff scientist at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory and a founding investigator of the Berkeley Institute for Data Science, created in 2013. He received a PhD in particle physics, followed by postdoctoral research in applied mathematics, developing numerical algorithms. Today, his research focuses on creating tools for modern computational research and data science across domain disciplines, with an emphasis on high-level languages, literate computing and reproducible research. He created IPython while a graduate student in 2001 and continues to lead it as it evolves into the Jupyter Project, now as a collaborative effort with a talented team that does all the hard work. He regularly lectures about scientific computing and data science, and is a member of the Python Software Foundation as well as a founding member of the Numfocus Foundation. He is the recipient of the 2012 Award for the Advancement of Free Software from the Free Software Foundation.

Event Category:

Video recorded: 

If you use a non-flash enabled device, you may download the video here

Open Space

Date and Time: 
2015 April 15 @ 3pm
Location: 
FL2 Cafeteria Atrium
Speaker: 
n/a

Open Space is an approach that enables groups of any size to address complex, important issues and achieve meaningful results quickly. In Open Space meetings and events, participants create and manage their own agenda of parallel working sessions around a central theme of strategic importance. Conference participants will have the opportunity to apply Open Space technique to self-organize and discuss relevant topics with other meeting attendees. A space to write down ideas, questions, and discussion topics will be available throughout the first two days of the conference.

Speaker Description: 

Facilitator:
Nathan Wilhelmi is a software engineer at the National Center for Atmospheric Research where he leads the Software and Web Engineering Group. Prior to working at NCAR Wilhelmi worked in software development across a range of private sector domains. His primary focus is in the area of application development using Agile project management and engineering practices.

Event Category:

TACC Stats: A Comprehensive and Transparent Resource Usage Monitoring Tool for HPC Systems

Date and Time: 
2015 April 14 @ 1:30pm
Location: 
FL2-1022 Large Auditorium
Speaker: 
Todd Evans

We have developed and deployed the transparent and comprehensive resource usage monitoring and analysis tool TACC Stats at the Texas Advanced Computing Center (TACC). This tool is currently used to aid TACC’s system administrators and HPC consultants in the diagnosis and resolution of application and system issues and to identify jobs with poor performance characteris- tics or inefficient resource usage utilization. TACC Stats automatically collects resource usage data at regular time intervals and computes performance metrics for every job run on an HPC system.

Speaker Description: 

Dr. Todd Evans is an HPC Research Associate at the Texas Advanced Computing Center and Research Scientist Lecturer in the Department of Statistics & Data Science at UT Austin. Dr. Evans received his Ph.D. in Physics from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign in 2008 and has been staff at UT Austin since 2013. Evans current research interests include the development of tools for transparent job-level monitoring and performance analysis of HPC systems.

Event Category:

Video recorded: 

If you use a non-flash enabled device, you may download the video here

Development of a Python GUI Interface to a YAML Configuration File for Propagation of Largely Identical Database Records between Field Project Entries

Date and Time: 
2015 April 14 @ 8:30am
Location: 
FL2-1022 Large Auditorium
Speaker: 
Soo Rin Park

The EOL Metadata Database and Cyberinfrastructure (EMDAC) is a comprehensive metadata database and integrated cyberinfrastructure which provides a public data portal to all of EOL’s field project data holdings. This paper demonstrates the use of the Python programming language to create a GUI (Graphical User Interface) tool that generates or edits a YAML (YAML Ain’t Markup Language) based metadata configuration file to automate data loading into the EOL metadata and (internal) data tracking system databases through user input and data serialization.

Speaker Description: 

Soo Park is currently pursuing an undergraduate degree in Electrical and Computer Engineering with a minor in Technology, Arts & Media at University of Colorado Boulder, and is expected to graduate May 2016. She has been working as a Software Assistant at NCAR/EOL since June 2014.

Event Category:

User Environment Tracking and Problem Detection with XALT

Date and Time: 
2015 April 14 @ 11:00am
Location: 
FL2-1022 Large Auditorium
Speaker: 
Robert McLay

XALT is a product to help sites understand individual users’ software needs, then leverages that understanding to help stakeholders conduct business in a more efficient, effective, and systematic way. It builds on work that is already improving the user experience and enhancing support programs for thousands of users on twelve supercomputers across the United States and Europe. XALT instruments individual jobs on high-end computers to generate a picture of the compilers, libraries, and other software that users need to run their jobs successfully.

Speaker Description: 

Doctor Robert McLay received bachelors and masters degree from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and his Ph.D in Engineering Mechanics from The University of Texas at Austin. His research include C++ software development, regression testing, and software tools, all related to large parallel numerical simulation codes. In particular, he has done work in parallel finite-element programs solving incompressible fluid flow and heat transfer.

His interest in software tools and support of HPC programming environments has lead to his development of Lmod, a modern replacement for Environment Modules system. Lmod's major advantages are protect all users from loading incompatible software without hindering experts. This work as lead to an interest in tracking the software usage through the module system.

Event Category:

Video recorded: 

If you use a non-flash enabled device, you may download the video here

Sharing computational results via SeedMe platform

Date and Time: 
2015 April 13 @ 1:30pm
Location: 
FL2-1022 Large Auditorium
Speaker: 
Amit Chourasia

Computational simulations have become an indispensable tool in a wide variety of science and engineering investigations. Nearly all scientific computation and analyses create important transient data and preliminary results. These transient data include information dumped while a job is running, such as coarse output and run statistics. Preliminary results include data output by a running or finished job that needs to be quickly processed to get a view of the job’s success or failure.

Speaker Description: 

Amit Chourasia leads the Visualization Services group at the San Diego Supercomputer Center. His work is focused on leading the research, development and application of software tools and techniques for scientific visualization; for data typically generated by massively large computer simulations in various fields of science and engineering. Key aspect of his work is to find ways to represent data in a visual form that is clear, succint and accurate (a challenging yet very exciting endeavour).

Amit's application and research interests are in area of animation, computer graphics, visualization and visual perception. He received a Master's degree in Computers Graphics Technology from Purdue University, West Lafayette and a Baccalaureate degree in Architecture (Honors) from Indian Institute of Technology, Kharagpur. Notable accolades for his work include Honorable Mention at International Science & Engineering Visualization Challenge 2010, Outstanding Achievement in Scientific Visualization award at the SciDAC 2011 & 2009 and Best Visualization Display award at TeraGrid 2011 & 2008 conferences. His visualization work has been featured at Siggraph Animation Festival, Siggraph Real Time Demos, documentaries by National Geographic and History Channel and many other news and media outlets.

Event Category:

Video recorded: 

If you use a non-flash enabled device, you may download the video here

Development of a Multi-physics Code with Adaptive Mesh Refinement

Date and Time: 
2015 April 13 @ 3:30pm
Location: 
FL2-1022 Large Auditorium
Speaker: 
William Dai

We have been working on the Roxane project for a few years. The Roxane project covers a variety of physics in standard geometries of one, two, and three dimensions, including hydrodynamics, volume fraction material advection, material mixing, elastic-plastic strength models, magnetohydrodynamics, 3-T radiation diffusion, detonation shock dynamics, high explosive burn models, etc. Although there are other kinds of AMR used in calculations on structured meshes, we use cell-based AMR.

Speaker Description: 

William Dai received his Ph.D. degree in physics in University of Minnesota in 1993. After that he joined Laboratory for Computational Science and Engineering as a research scientist in the University, focusing on numerical methods for hydrodynamics, magnetohydrodynamics, radiation, and diffusion. William joined the Los Alamos National Laboratory in 2001 as a staff member in High Performance Computing Division. In 2002 he became a team leader and project leader responsible for software development and their integration to several multi-physics codes. Currently, William is a scientist in Computer, Computational, and Statistical Sciences Division, and he is one of the key developers of a large-scale multi-physics code, responsible for new physics capabilities, numerical solvers, and modernization of the code on future computer platforms.

Event Category:

Quality Controlling Wind Power Data for Data Mining Applications

Date and Time: 
2015 April 13 @ 2:30pm
Location: 
FL2-1022 Large Auditorium
Speaker: 
Gerry Wiener

Wind power generation is playing an increasingly important role in worldwide energy production. In order to optimize the utilization of wind power, it is critical to have a good handle on observed winds, the associated power production at wind farms and the power delivered to associated connection nodes. In practice, the power production at various wind farms is subject to wind farm curtailment, high speed wind turbine tripping, production loss due to turbine icing, turbine availability, and so forth.

Speaker Description: 

Dr. Gerry Wiener has been a software engineer at NCAR since 1987. He is currently the engineering deputy of the Weather Systems and Assessment Program at NCAR/RAL under Dr. Sue Ellen Haupt. Gerry has worked on a variety of projects including FAA wind shear/microbursts, FAA turbulence, FAA ceiling and visibility, Hong Kong wind shear and turbulence, wind and solar power forecasting for renewable energy, and road weather.

Event Category:

Video recorded: 

If you use a non-flash enabled device, you may download the video here

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