conference-talk

Improved Data Curation and Exploration: Timelines for Visualizing Data Inventory

Date and Time: 
Monday 2018 Apr 2nd
Location: 
CG Auditorium
Speaker: 
Aaron Sweeney

Timelines are a very effective way of visualizing data inventory. They lead to the improvement of both data curation and exploration. Here, we present timelines for archived ocean-bottom pressure data and coastal tide gauge data at the National Centers for Environmental Information (NCEI). Metadata about the inventories are expressed in Javascript Object Notation (JSON) format and visualized on a timeline through an open-source Javascript library (VisJS). Through these timelines, gaps in coverage immediately become apparent.

Speaker Description: 

Dr. Sweeney is the water level (coastal tide gauge and deep-ocean bottom pressure recorder) data manager at the NOAA National Centers for Environmental Information, in support of the NOAA Tsunami Program. He uses a variety of software tools and programming languages, among them Python and Javascript, to make it easier for people to discover and access data. He also has had the pleasure of teaching introductory physics to undergraduates for several years.

Event Category:

Software Engineering for Fusion Reactor Design

Date and Time: 
Monday 2018 Apr 2nd
Location: 
CG Auditorium
Speaker: 
Wayne Arter

ITER is a global scientific collaboration to prove the feasibility of fusion energy from magnetically confined plasmas on an industrial scale. Construction of the ITER facilities is underway at Cadarache in the south of France. To finish detailed ITER design, operate and interpret ITER, and thence to design future fusion reactors, it would be desirable to have software to model the ionised plasma and its interactions which has a thirty-year-plus life span, capable not only of use but also of significant modification until c.2050.

Speaker Description: 

Dr. Arter has worked for many years at Culham where he is currently employed as a senior staff scientist by UKAEA, the UK Atomic Energy Authority. Important aspects of his current role are physics modelling, mathematical analysis and algorithm design. His interests also extend into allied fields, such as data analysis and visualisation, and CAD and mesh generation. Common to much of his research work has been the investigation of physical phenomena, by means of computer simulation.

Event Category:

HPC network stack on Arm

Date and Time: 
Wednesday 2018 Apr 4th
Location: 
CG Auditorium
Speaker: 
Pavel Shamis

Applications, programming languages, and libraries that leverage sophisticated network hardware capabilities have a natural advantage when used in today's and tomorrow's high-performance and data center computer environments. Modern RDMA based network interconnects provides incredibly rich functionality (RDMA, Atomics, OS-bypass, etc.) that enable low-latency and high-bandwidth communication services. The functionality is supported by a variety of interconnect technologies such as InfiniBand, RoCE, iWARP, Intel OPA, Cray's Aries/Gemini, and others.

Speaker Description: 

Pavel Shamis is Principal Research Engineer at ARM. He specializes in High Performance Computing (HPC), Message Parsing Interface (MPI), SHMEM (API for Parallel Programming), Partitioned Global Address Space (PGAS), Remote Direct Memory Access (RDMA), and Infiniband.

Event Category:

Utilizing Python to incorporate and tie together legacy code

Date and Time: 
Wednesday 2018 Apr 4th
Location: 
CG Auditorium
Speaker: 
Josh Elliott

Scientific software is often dependent on many disparate libraries of code written by multiple people over the course of decades. Legacy code is often not updated for fear of breaking already working code, which often drives the choice of programming language. This forces future developers to rely upon and utilize outdated and/or proprietary programming languages which can hinder scientific development and prevent the use of more advanced software techniques or tools. This tutorial will focus on utilizing Python to incorporate and tie together your existing IDL and/or Matlab code.

Speaker Description: 

Josh Elliott is a Scientific Programmer at the Laboratory for Atmospheric and Space Physics at the University of Colorado at Boulder. He has worked on scientific software in commercial, non-profit and academic settings with experience in multiple programming languages. He currently writes software for the NASA SORCE and MAVEN missions.

Event Category:

Video recorded: 

Slides, code examples and other tutorial material: https://github.com/spacemanjosh/Python-to-Legacy-Code-Tutorial

Beyond Matplotlib: Building Interactive Climate Data Visualizations with Bokeh and Friends

Date and Time: 
Thursday 2018 Apr 5th
Location: 
CG Auditorium
Speaker: 
Anderson Banihirwe

Visualization represents a major bottleneck in scientific research, engineering, data science, and data analytics. The tools in the Python scientific ecosystem make it very simple to do many of the tasks required, but building visualizations to help understand complex patterns and relationships in your data still typically involves a large amount of custom coding for every new type of plot. For the last few years, the Python data visualization ecosystem has expanded tremendously.

Speaker Description: 

Anderson is a graduating senior in Systems Engineering department at the University of Arkansas at Little Rock, and a former research intern at CISL/NCAR. He currently works at First Orion as a Data Scientist Intern in Little Rock, AR. He is interested in parallel and distributed computing, and data analytics infrastructures for Python's open source ecosystem.

Event Category:

Video recorded: 

Contemporary peer code review, a lightweight, asynchronous method for ensuring high-quality code

Date and Time: 
Wednesday 2018 Apr 4th
Location: 
CG Auditorium
Speaker: 
Jeffrey Carver

Contemporary peer code review is a lightweight, asynchronous method for ensuring high-quality code. While this practice has been shown to be beneficial to help developers identify and remove faults from code, it is underutilized in scientific software. To remedy this situation, we propose a hands-on tutorial. The first part of the tutorial will provide important background information and motivation for the usefulness of contemporary peer code review.

Speaker Description: 

Jeffrey Carver is a Professor in the Department of Computer Science at the University of Alabama. He earned his PhD in 2003 from the University of Maryland. His research focuses on the application of empirical software engineering to study scientific software, peer-code review, software quality, human factors, and open-source software. He is the primary organizer of the SE4Science workshop series (http://se4science.org/workshops). He is a Senior Member of the IEEE and the ACM.

Event Category:

Profiling and Debugging with TAU Commander

Date and Time: 
Friday 2018 Apr 6th
Location: 
CG Auditorium
Speaker: 
Sameer Shende

TAU Commander is a high productivity performance engineering workflow manager for applying profiling and tracing tools for performance analysis of parallel programs at all scales. TAU Commander is based on the TAU Performance System, which has helped many projects scale up successfully on systems at Oak Ridge Leadership Computing Facility (OLCF), the National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center (NERSC), the Argonne Leadership Computing Facility (ALCF), and others.

Speaker Description: 

Sameer Shende is Director of the Performance Research Laboratory at the University of Oregon

Event Category:

Atmospheric data analysis with Dask and Xarray

Date and Time: 
Thursday 2018 Apr 5th
Location: 
CG Auditorium
Speaker: 
Kevin Paul and Joe Hamman

Dask is a Python-based "flexible parallel computing library for analytic computing." Dask provides a simple interface to parallel data analysis tasks without requiring parallel computing knowledge from the user. Xarray is a Python package that provides an in-memory data model (and operations on that data) consistent with the Common Data Model used by NetCDF. Together, Dask and Xarray provide a parallel-computing platform ideal for analysis of Earth System Science data.

Speaker Description: 

Dr. Kevin Paul is a scientist at the National Center for Atmospheric Research and an expert on parallel computation and workflow optimization.

Dr. Joe Hamman is a post-doctoral fellow with the National Center for Atmospheric Research and one of the lead authors of Xarray.

Event Category:

Metereological data analysis and visualization with MetPy

Date and Time: 
Friday 2018 Apr 6th
Location: 
CG Auditorium
Speaker: 
Ryan May and John Leeman

The use of the Python programming language has grown immensely over the past decade and has become an essential tool within education, research, and industry within the atmospheric sciences. This course aims to go beyond a basic Python introduction and help attendees advance their ability to apply Python to practical problems in meteorology. This includes topics such as remote data access, calculation of derived quantities, and plotting of these quantities on map projections.

Speaker Description: 

Ryan May is a software engineer at UCAR/Unidata, working on Python software and training for the atmospheric science community. Currently, he is the core developer of the MetPy and Siphon Python packages, as well as a member of the development team for the matplotlib Python visualization library.

Event Category:

High Performance Distributed Deep Learning: A Beginner’s Guide

Date and Time: 
Thursday 2018 Apr 5th
Location: 
CG Auditorium
Speaker: 
DK Panda, Ammar Awan and Hari Subramoni

The current wave of advances in Deep Learning (DL) has led to many exciting challenges and opportunities for Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence researchers alike. Modern DL frameworks like Caffe/Caffe2, TensorFlow, CNTK, Torch, and several others have emerged that offer ease of use and flexibility to describe, train, and deploy various types of Deep Neural Networks (DNN) including deep convolutional nets. In this tutorial, we will provide an overview of interesting trends in DL and how cutting-edge hardware architectures are playing a key role in moving the field forward.

Speaker Description: 

Ammar Ahmad Awan received his B.S. and M.S.degrees in Computer Science and Engineering from National University of Science and Technology (NUST), Pakistan and Kyung Hee University (KHU), South Korea, respectively. Currently, Ammar is working towards his Ph.D. degree in Computer Science and Engineering at The Ohio State University. His current research focus lies at the intersection of High Performance Computing (HPC) libraries and Deep Learning (DL) frameworks. He previously worked on a Java-based Message Passing Interface (MPI) and nested parallelism with OpenMP and MPI for scientific applications. He has published 14 papers in conferences and journals related to these research areas. He actively contributes to various projects like MVAPICH2-GDR (High Performance MPI for GPU clusters, OMB (OSU Micro Benchmarks), and HiDL (High Performance Deep Learning). He is the lead author of the OSU-Caffe framework (part of HiDL project) that allows efficient distributed training of Deep Neural Networks.

Dhabaleswar K. (DK) Panda is Professor and University Distinguished Scholar of Computer Science and Engineering at The Ohio State University. He leads the Network-Based Computing Research Group.

Event Category:

Pages

Subscribe to conference-talk