seminar

The Assimilation Project: Discovery and Monitoring Without Limit

Date and Time: 
2013 Sept 26th @ 3pm
Location: 
CG1-1214 North Auditorium
Speaker: 
Alan Robertson

The Assimilation Project provides integrated IT discovery and monitoring aimed at risk management and mitigation. Discovery finds systems, services, dependencies, including services you aren’t monitoring and systems you’ve forgotten about. About 30% of all outside security breaches come through forgotten systems. Discovery is continuous and has zero-network-footprint.; Monitoring is extremely scalable due to a radically distributed architecture. Discovery informs monitoring - simplifying configuration and maintenance.

Speaker Description: 

Alan is a well-known speaker on high availability, discovery, monitoring, scalability and graph databases having spoken at over 30 conferences over the world. He founded and leads the Assimilation Project providing scalable, continuous IT discovery and monitoring. He also founded the Linux-HA project (currently known as Pacemaker) and led it for about 10 years.

He works for Assimilation Systems Limited which he founded to develop and support the Assimilation Project. He previously worked at IBM, SuSE, and Bell Labs.

Event Category:

Video recorded: 

If you use a non-flash enabled device, you may download the video here

A comparison of climate applications on accelerated and conventional architectures

Date and Time: 
2013 August 29th @ 3pm
Location: 
ML-132 Main Seminar
Speaker: 
Srinath Vadlamani, Youngsung Kim, John Dennis

Contributing author: John Dennis

Speaker Description: 

Srinath Vadlamani obtained his Ph.D. from CU-Boulder in 2005 in Applied Mathematics with advisor Jim Meiss. Dr. Vadlamani did his post-doc for a year at the Univ. of Washington with Uri Shumlack developing finite volume methods for MHD simulations of innovative fusion confinement concepts. He returned to Boulder in 2006 and Tech-X Corporation working with algorithm development for MHD and gyrokinetic codes. He was part of the FACETS integrated modeling SCIDAC effort and created the interlagnuage interoperable generator that exposed fortran transport codes to the C++ FACETS framework. In Aug. 2012, Dr. Vadlamani joined NCAR's ASAP group to help with efficient usage of accelerated hardware for NCAR's climate codes.

After an undergraduate degree in Electronic Engineering at Dankook University of South Korea, Youngsung Kim has worked in mobile telecommunication industry for 13 years mostly as a software developer. In 2010, he returned back to school at University of Utah and majored in Scientific Computing. During the study, he participated WRF climate simulation project and brain image matching project along with taking core courses including numerical methods and parallel computing. After graduation with master's degree from Univ. of Utah, he joined NCAR and has been working on accelerator technologies until now.

Event Category:

Video recorded: 

If you use a non-flash enabled device, you may download the video here

WRF in the Cloud: Practical Big Compute on Windows Azure

Date and Time: 
2013 August 1st @ 3pm
Location: 
FL2-1022 Large Auditorium
Speaker: 
Wenming Ye

Windows Azure has become a mature business cloud platform in the last two years. While web 2.0 companies enjoy the benefits of cloud on Windows Azure, the general research and scientific computing communities are just getting familiar with the platform. With the availability of IAAS Linux, Hadoop, IPython Notebooks, F#, Microsoft's Cloud Platform offers researchers the convenience to collaborate, and share their research online better. In this talk we’ll demonstrate the readiness of the crucial Big Compute and Big Data enabler technologies on Windows Azure for researchers.

Speaker Description: 

After completing his graduate work at CU Boulder, Mr. Ye joined SRI International, where he focused on design and development of innovative wireless, handheld, and Web-based simulation tools and services. Mr. Ye returned to Boulder as a developer on the commercialization team at Tech-X Corp, where he developed and productized large-scale HPC software. Mr. Ye is currently a Senior Research Program Manager responsible for Cloud-based Big Data and Big Compute projects at Microsoft Research.

Event Category:

Video recorded: 

If you use a non-flash enabled device, you may download the video here

Building Python-Based Operational Systems for Prediction of Atmospheric Processes

Date and Time: 
2013 June 20th @ 3pm
Location: 
FL2-1022 Large Auditorium
Speaker: 
Don Morton

In the context of atmospheric models, operational systems are those that dependably provide important, time-critical forecasts for use in decision-support systems.  They are characterized by the need for rapid data acquisition and model setup, reliable execution of the model, and post-processing activities that sometimes require delivery of model output timesteps as soon as they are completed.  In Alaska, reliable and timely weather forecasts are essential for a variety of commercial, recreational, and simple day-to-day living activities.

Speaker Description: 

Don Morton is currently a Research Professor of Computer Science at the University of Alaska Arctic Region Supercomputing Center, and has recently launched a private venture, Boreal Scientific Computing LLC, as a mechanism for contributing operational forecasting expertise to a variety of organisations.  With a B.S. in Computer Science from the College of Great Falls, Montana, and a Ph.D. from Louisiana State University, Don has spent his career trying to apply his talents in computer science to his passion for science, especially the environmental sciences.  

Event Category:

Video recorded: 

If no video is visible below, change https to http in the URL.

If you use a non-flash enabled device, you may download the video here

Open Source and Flexibility

Date and Time: 
2013 May 16th @ 3:00pm
Location: 
ML-132 Main Seminar
Speaker: 
Simon Phipps
When we think of open source, it's easy to believe it's just about licensing software. But the core value it brings is actually flexibility - the creation of fluid cultures where innovation can flow freely and where software can be adapted as needs changed with the minimum of interference from outside your organisation.
Speaker Description: 

Simon Phipps is President at the Open Source Initiative (OSI), the non-profit organisation that advocates for open source software, builds bridges between open source communities and maintains the canonical list of open source licenses. Currently an independent consultant on open source policy and practice, he was previously head of open source at Sun Microsystems, CSO of startup Forgerock and a founder of IBM’s Java business unit.

Apart from his pro bono participation at OSI, he is also on the board of the Open Rights Group and the leadership team of The Document Foundation. He has been widely involved in standardisation activities, including as a founding director of the Open Mobile Alliance and as one of the Sun executives sponsoring the donation of resources to OASIS to create Open Document Format (ODF). He is a Fellow of the British Computer Society as well as an Open Forum Fellow.

http://webmink.com/

Event Category:

Video recorded: 

If no video is visible below, change https to http in the URL.

If you use a non-flash enabled device, you may download the video here

Linux (In Other Words, Android)

Date and Time: 
2013 Apr 25th @ 3:00pm
Location: 
ML-132 Main Seminar
Speaker: 
Jeffrey Haemer

It's 1983. A time traveler materializes in front of me. He hesitates a moment, then asks, "You're a UNIX guy, right?"

I say, "Right."

"In another thirty years, the dominant UNIX flavor will be the one running inside phones."

"Well ... okay. Bell is a telephone company. But how will users dial up the printer?"

I will give a 5,000-foot view of that flavor, called Android, to get you excited about developing on it yourself. You did UNIX. You did primitive Linux. Why bail out now and give other developers all the fun?

Speaker Description: 

For the last two years, Jeffrey S. Haemer has been doing source-code management (SCM) at Aircell, in Broomfield, Colorado. A couple of his projects are Android-based smartphones, which Aircell (a telco for the aviation industry) builds from the ground up. In 1983, Dr. Haemer helped make the first, commercial, Intel-based Unix. Between those, he has done many equally bizarre-yet-worthwhile things.

Many.

Event Category:

Video recorded: 
Presenation material

If no video is visible below, change https to http in the URL.

You should also see an option to download the video on non-flash enabled devices.

Google Earth Engine

Date and Time: 
2013 Mar 11th @ 9:00am
Location: 
ML-132 Main Seminar, FL1-2198 EOL Atrium and CG1-1214 North Auditorium
Speaker: 
Tyler Erickson

The Google Earth Engine platform is a system designed to enable petabyte-scale, scientific analysis and visualization of geospatial datasets. Earth Engine provides a consolidated environment including a massive data catalog co-located with thousands of computers for analysis. The user-friendly front-end provides a workbench environment to allow interactive data and algorithm development and exploration and provides a convenient mechanism for scientists to share data, visualizations and analytic algorithms via URLs.

Speaker Description: 

Dr. Tyler Erickson is Senior Developer Advocate on the Earth Engine team at Google. In this role he works with scientific organizations to demonstrate the capabilities of Google's geospatial tools for managing, analyzing, and visualizing geospatial datasets, and to guide the development of new features to meet the needs of scientific communities. Prior to joining Google he worked in academia as a research scientist, specializing in applying modern open source geospatial information technologies to the analysis of environmental datasets. Dr. Erickson is a former University of Colorado INSTAAR researcher (Ph.D. 2004), where he worked with Prof. Mark Williams on the geostatistical analysis of snow distribution.

Event Category:

Transition to Agile Software Development

Date and Time: 
2013 Jan 31st @ 3:00pm
Location: 
CG1-1214 North Auditorium
Speaker: 
Nathan Wilhelmi

While not new, Agile frameworks have come into the spotlight in recent years for yielding significant improvements over heavyweight process. The Visualization and Enabling Technologies section has been transitioning to Agile frameworks for our Science Gateways efforts. In this talk I will share what being Agile has meant for group. I will cover our experience in transitioning to Scrum for software development and the benefits we have experienced. I will also discus our newly underway efforts to utilize Kanban for related activities such as user support and infrastructure management.

Speaker Description: 

Nathan Wilhelmi is a software engineer in the visualization and enabling technologies section of CISL. In this role he has been working on implementing Agile methodologies within VETS science gateways efforts. He has been a Java developer at NCAR since joining in 2003. He came to NCAR from the private sector having worked as a software engineer across several industries.

Event Category:

Video recorded: 

Fortran Standards Update

Date and Time: 
2012 Dec 18th @ 3:00pm
2012 Dec 20th @ 3:30pm
Location: 
FL2-1001 Small Seminar on the 18th -- ML-132 Main Seminar on the 20th
Speaker: 
Dan Nagle

Currently, Fortran compilers vary widely in their support of Fortran 2003 and Fortran 2008. This limits portability. The Fortran committees have responded by proposing that only very modest features be added for Fortran 1x. The work list is now open for suggestions. Also, the Fortran committees have written an annex for TS 24772, "Guidance to Avoiding Vulnerabilities in Programming Languages through Language Selection and Use". This is intended to be useful as a starting point for development of coding standards.

Speaker Description: 

Daniel Nagle is the chair of PL22.3 (formerly J3) Fortran Standard Committee. He got his PhD in Computational Science from GMU and is working in UCAR’s Consulting Service Group. He has been using and teaching Fortran since the '60s and has been parallel programming in Fortran and other languages since the '80s

Event Category:

Chaos in computer performance

Date and Time: 
2012 Nov 29th @ 3:00pm
Location: 
ML-132 Main Seminar
Speaker: 
Elizabeth Bradley

Though it is not necessarily the view taken by those who design them, modern computers are deterministic nonlinear dynamical systems, and it is both interesting and useful to treat them as such. In this talk, I will describe a nonlinear dynamics-based framework for modeling computer systems.

Speaker Description: 

Elizabeth Bradley did her undergraduate and graduate work at MIT, interrupted by a one-year leave of absence to row in the 1988 Olympic Games, and has been with the Department of Computer Science at the University of Colorado at Boulder since January of 1993. Her research interests include nonlinear dynamics, artificial intelligence, and control theory. She is the recipient of a NSF National Young Investigator award, a Packard Fellowship, a Radcliffe Fellowship, and the 1999 student-voted University of Colorado College of Engineering teaching award.

Event Category:

Video recorded: 

Pages

Subscribe to seminar