seminar

Twenty years with a Free Software Project

Date and Time: 
2010 Oct 28th @ 3:15pm
Location: 
ML - Main Seminar Room
Speaker: 
Chet Ramey

Chet Ramey has been working on large Free Software projects since 1989. In that time, he has encountered and overcome many novel software engineering issues and problems. This talk will cover twenty years of Bash and Readline development, concentrating on the engineering aspects of creating and distributing widely-used free software. It's a behind- the-scenes look at the somewhat unorthodox way Bash and Readline are produced.

Speaker Description: 

Chet Ramey is a longtime employee of Case Western Reserve University in Cleveland, Ohio, from which he received a B.S. in Computer Engineering and an M.S. in Computer Science. He's currently the Assistant Director of Technology Infrastructure Services and manages the Network Engineering and Operations groups. He has been working with Bash since 1989, and had sole development and maintenance responsibility for Bash and Readline since 1993.

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Future Directions in Large Scale Systems Monitoring

Date and Time: 
2010 Sept 30th @ 3:15pm
Location: 
ML - Main Seminar Room
Speaker: 
Mike Lowe

As HPC systems have grown in size and complexity, monitoring of these systems hasn't kept pace. Current systems either don't scale or are the wrong fit, some systems are comprised of scripts systems administrators have migrated from machine to machine. Attempts to select a monitoring solution are further complicated by requirements for sharing data across administrative boundaries and existing monitoring systems. The current state of monitoring HPC resources will be discussed along with the motivations for finding new solutions. Ongoing experiments involving

Speaker Description: 

Michael Lowe received a BS from Purdue's School of Electrical and Computer Engineering with a focus on chip and embedded design. He has been employed for the past five years as a systems administrator at Indiana University. Prior experience includes a four year term as a network administrator at a Fortune 500 company.

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Developing a New Software Engineering Process within NCAR

Date and Time: 
2010 Aug 26th @ 3:15pm
Location: 
FL2-1001 Small Seminar
Speaker: 
Gerry Wiener

Since the 1980’s, the Research Applications Laboratory (RAL) here at NCAR has been performing work for the FAA in the area of nowcasting and forecasting hazardous weather that affects aviation. Along these lines RAL has collaborated both with Lincoln Labs and NOAA in creating real-time systems that provide hazardous weather products to FAA controllers, airline dispatch, pilots and weather forecasters.

Speaker Description: 

Gerry Wiener has been a software engineer at NCAR since 1987. He is currently the engineering deputy under Bill Mahoney in the Weather Systems and Assessment Program at RAL. He has worked on a variety of projects including FAA wind shear/microbursts, FAA turbulence, FAA ceiling and visibility, Hong Kong wind shear and turbulence, wind forecasting for renewable energy and road weather.

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G. Wiener

How Google Tests Software

Date and Time: 
2010 Jul 29th @ 3:15pm
Location: 
CG1-1210 South Auditorium
Speaker: 
James A. Whittaker

The mythology around Google Test runs like a ghostly spirit through the larger software quality community. Google automates everything. Google's cloud is the ultimate tester playground. Sometimes myth is larger than reality and sometime the reverse is true. In this talk James Whittaker will dispel some Google Test myths and reinforce others. There is indeed a secret sauce we mix into our product quality efforts and many of its flavors can be sampled in this short presentation.

Speaker Description: 

James A. Whittaker joined Google in May 2009 as a Test Engineering Director where he oversees the testing of Chrome browser, Chrome operating system and a bevy of other products. Formerly an Architect with Microsoft’s Visual Studio Team System, he directed product strategy for Microsoft’s test business and led internal teams in the application of exploratory testing. Dr. Whittaker previously served as Professor of Computer Science at Florida Tech. There, he was named a Top Scholar by The Journal of Systems and Software, and led a research team that created many leading-edge testing tools and technologies, including the acclaimed runtime fault injection tool Holodeck. Whittaker is author of Exploratory Software Testing: Tips, Tricks, Tours and Techniques to Guide Test Designand How to Break Software. He is coauthor (with Hugh Thompson) of How to Break Software Security, co-author (with Mike Andrews) of How to Break Web Software and author of 50+ peer-reviewed papers on software development and security, and the holder of patents on various inventions in security testing and defensive security techniques. Dr. Whittaker has a PhD in computer science from the University of Tennessee.

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J. Whittaker

Intel Compilers and Software Tools - Vision for Tomorrow

Date and Time: 
2010 Jun 24th @3:15pm
Location: 
FL2-1001 Small Seminar
Speaker: 
Dr. Padmanabhan Iyer

After an overview of the Intel Software Tools suite, this talk will focus on the current and some of the planned features of Intel compilers for the multi- and many-core Intel Architecture.

Speaker Description: 

Dr. Pad Iyer has been active in the field of High Performance Computing for more than two decades. At Intel, his current activities center around communicating the value of the Intel Architecture in HPC.  Prior to joining Intel he has held various research and project leadership positions in the area of High Performance Computing at Linux Network and Chevron. He holds a Ph.D in Chemical Engineering from Northwestern University and started his career in the faculty of the Engineering School at Princeton University.

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Graphics Processors for Atmospheric Modeling, Experience with a Small Kernel and Implications for a Full Model.

Date and Time: 
2010 May 26th @ 3:30pm
Location: 
ML - Main Seminar Room
Speaker: 
Rory Kelly

Modern graphics processing units offer enticing speedups for atmospheric modeling. However, accelerating large and complex models using GPUs is not a straightforward task. To explore the potential for using GPUs to accelerate an atmospheric model, I ported an expensive portion of the CAM radiation code to an Nvidia GPU. I will talk about performance that can be achieved for this test case, what it means in the context of a full model, current limitations to using GPUs, and future trends and technologies that will help overcome these limitations.

Speaker Description: 

Rory C. Kelly is a Software Engineer in the Consulting Services Group. While studying physics at the University of Colorado, he accidentally learned Fortran, which eventually landed him a job at NCAR in 2001. He specializes in benchmarking and performance testing, and in his spare time he likes to fiddle with weird computing hardware, including GPU, FPGAs, and other computational accelerators.

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Rory Kelly

Using Software Toilet Plungers

Date and Time: 
2010 Apr 29th @ 3:30pm
Location: 
ML - Main Seminar Room
Speaker: 
Jeffrey S. Haemer

Science: fun!
Software development: glamorous!

Version control? Boring.
Code reviews? Boring.
Builds? Boring.
Testing? Boring.
Packaging? Releases? Boring.
Zzzz.

I'm not the guy who models obstructed water flows around oblate spheroids in S-shaped pipes, using pentagonal, finite elements with moving boundaries.

I do boring, practical stuff. I'm the guy who unclogs your toilet.

It's worth knowing how to work a toilet plunger. Otherwise, you always have to pay a plumber, and we're expensive.

Speaker Description: 

Jeffrey S. Haemer is Software Configuration Manager at Aztek Networks, in Boulder, Colorado.

Dr. Haemer has worked and consulted on various aspects of software manufacturing since 1983, when he helped produce the first, Intel-based, Unix system: PC/IX on the IBM PC/XT.

He has done Unix and Linux education and training for organizations like Uniforum and the University of Colorado, and in places like Romania and Kuwait. He has served as Standards Representative for the Usenix Association. He is a contributing author of The Linux Administration Handbook and has published over a hundred articles and papers on software engineering for Unix and Linux.

He coordinates the monthly, speakers program for the Boulder Linux Users Group.

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Jeffrey Haemer

Using the Wt Web Toolkit to build a Cross Platform Graphical User Interface

Date and Time: 
2010 Mar 30th @ 3:30pm
Location: 
FL2-1022 Large Auditorium
Speaker: 
Joseph VanAndel

When building a graphical user interface to run on multiple operating systems, there are many toolkits to choose from. Many traditional toolkits require deploying object code or byte-code to each computer, which requires periodically updating each computer with the latest code. Since nearly all computers have web browsers, an alternative is to write a GUI using a web browser. Current web browsers now support HTML/XHTML, JavaScript, CSS, AJAX, Forms, DHTML, SVG/VML/Canvas that provide a high level of interactivity.

Speaker Description: 

Joe VanAndel graduated from Calvin College, Grand Rapids, MI with a double major of mathematics and physics in 1978. He earned his master's degree in computer science at University of California at Berkeley in 1980. Joe worked at AT&T Bell Laboratories in Westminster, CO on a real-time operating system called Oryx/Pecos. His next job was with Cadnetix, where he worked on porting Unix to proprietary workstations and servers, computer aided design tools, and software configuration management. In 1988, Joe started working at NCAR/EOL. His initial job was to lead a software team that transformed a prototype radar into a research testbed that served the FAA and the National Weather Service. Since this project, Joe has mostly worked on remote sensing with radars and lidars. He also worked on Driftsonde - a stratospheric balloon system that drops sondes from 90,000 feet in remote areas of the planet.

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Video recorded: 

view with Real Player or VLC Player: rtsp://real.ucar.edu/mms/eol/joe_vanandel.mp4
view with QuickTime: http://www.fin.ucar.edu/it/mms/webcasts/eol/joe_vanandel.mov
view offline: http://real.ucar.edu/mms/eol/joe_vanandel.mp4 (right-click and select "Save Link as...")

There are a few known bugs: if your players refuse to play the presentation, this is usually due to the version software you are using and could also be related to your OS.  Some known recent issues are with Snow Leopard Quicktime compatibility with the new streaming server or a delayed green screen of 10 seconds before the video resolves to full screen. We are working on a completely browser-based solution to overcome these bugs

Engineering the Software for Understanding Climate Change

Date and Time: 
2010 Mar 3rd @ 10am
Location: 
ML - Main Seminar Room
Speaker: 
Steve Easterbrook, University of Toronto

This talk will examine the software development processes used to develop GCMs, drawing especially on a detailed study of the practices used at the UK Met Office. We compare the practices used to develop climate models to the development processes used for other types of software, including commercial and open source software. In a number of important aspects, the processes at the Met Office produce better quality software than many industry best practices. In particular, the current configuration management, testing and model validation

Speaker Description: 

Steve Easterbrook is a professor of computer science at the University of Toronto. He received his Ph.D. (1991) in Computing from Imperial College in London (UK), and was a lecturer at the School of Cognitive and Computing Science, University of Sussex from 1990 to 1995. In 1995 he moved to the US to lead the research team at NASA´s Independent Verification and Validation (IV&V) Facility in West Virginia, where he investigated software verification on the Space Shuttle Flight Software, the International Space Station, the Earth Observation System, and several planetary probes. He moved to the University of Toronto in 1999. His research interests range from modelling and analysis of complex software software systems to the socio-cognitive aspects of team interaction, including communication, coordination, and shared understanding in large software teams. He has served on the program committees for many conferences and workshops in Requirements Engineering and Software Engineering, and was general chair for RE'01 and program chair for ASE'06. In the summer of 2008, he was a visiting scientist at the UK Met Office Hadley Centre.

Event Category:

Video recorded: 

view with Real Player or VLC Player: rtsp://real.ucar.edu/mms/cisl/steve_easterbrook.mp4
view with QuickTime: http://real.ucar.edu/mms/cisl/steve_easterbrook.mov
view offline: http://real.ucar.edu/mms/cisl/steve_easterbrook.mp4 (right-click and select "Save Link as...")

CCSM4 - A Flexible New Infrastructure for Earth System Modeling

Date and Time: 
2010 Feb 23rd @ 3.30pm
Location: 
ML - Main Seminar Room
Speaker: 
Mariana Vertenstein, CGD, NCAR

CCSM4 will contain totally new infrastructure capabilities that permit new flexibility and extensibility to address the challenges involved in earth system modeling. An integral part of CCSM4 is the implementation of a coupling architecture that takes a completely new approach with respect to the high-level design of the system.

Speaker Description: 

Mariana Vertenstein is Head of the CCSM Software Engineering Group.

Event Category:

Video recorded: 

view with Real Player or VLC Player: rtsp://real.ucar.edu/mms/cgd/mariana_vertenstein.mp4
view with QuickTime: http://real.ucar.edu/mms/cgd/mariana_vertenstein.mov
view offline: http://real.ucar.edu/mms/cgd/mariana_vertenstein.mp4  (right-click and select "Save Link as...")

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