seminar

How Python's Decorators and Generators simplify Asynchronous Coding

Date and Time: 
2014 April 24th @ 3pm
Location: 
FL-1022 Large Auditorium
Speaker: 
Joe VanAndel

Controlling and monitoring hardware often requires handling multiple concurrent operations, including querying instruments via remote procedure calls, sending commands to instruments over TCP/IP sockets, and monitoring devices via SNMP, while continuing to respond to status requests. One solution is to write servers with multiple threads that coordinate via semaphores. However, multithreaded Python programs can be difficult to write and debug.

Speaker Description: 

Joe VanAndel is a software engineer in the Remote Sensing Facility in EOL. Joe graduated from Calvin College, Grand Rapids, MI with a double major of mathematics and physics in 1978. He earned a Master's degree in Computer Science at University of California at Berkeley in 1980. Joe worked at AT&T Bell Laboratories in Westminster, CO on a real-time operating system called Oryx/Pecos. His next job was with Cadnetix, where he worked on porting Unix to proprietary workstations and servers, computer aided design tools, and software configuration management. In 1988, Joe started working at NCAR/EOL and lead a software team that transformed a prototype weather radar into a research testbed serving the FAA and the National Weather Service. Joe has continued to work with radars and lidars, working on diagnostic software, data acquisition hardware and software, fuzzy logic-based data classification tools, radar control software, web-based user interfaces, data displays, and hardware/software monitoring tools.

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Docker: What's in it for me?

Date and Time: 
2014 March 20th @ 3pm
Location: 
ML-132 Main Seminar
Speaker: 
Ian Truslove

Docker is a new containerization tool that seems to be all the rage. But what is it, what is it being used for, and more importantly, "what's in it for me?" This presentation will provide a developer/devops point of view of some introductory concepts and tools used to build, deploy and run Docker containers, and how Docker might fit into highly scalable web application architectures.

Speaker Description: 

Ian Truslove is a software engineer working on large cloud-based archiving solutions for Sonian. He has worked in various software roles for quite some time now, and has been learning, working with, contributing to, leading and coaching agile teams with agile development practices for the last seven. Contact Ian at @iantruslove

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Video recorded: 

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Documentation with Doxygen and DocBook

Date and Time: 
2014 January 30th @ 3pm
Location: 
ML-132 Main Seminar
Speaker: 
Craig Ruff

Description:

Speaker Description: 

Craig is a software engineer in the Data Analysis Services Group of CISL, where he is responsible for assisting with the provision and administation of high performance shared file systems, data management and data transfer applications. He has been at NCAR since 1987, and has in the past worked on the NCAR Mass Storage System (MSS), Text and Graphics Server (TAGS), networked applications, device drivers and the administration of networked computer systems using a number of types operating systems.

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Video recorded: 

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Scalable realtime architectures using Python on Storm

Date and Time: 
2013 November 14th @ 3pm
Location: 
CG1-1214 North Auditorium
Speaker: 
Jim Baker
Description
 
Speaker Description: 
 Jim is a committer on Jython, for which he has worked on nearly every aspect from compilation to Unicode, and a co-author of the Definitive Guide to Jython. Jim is a senior software developer at Rackspace, where he works at the intersection of big data and cloud computing. He is also a lecturer in computer science at the University of Colorado at Boulder, where he teaches Principles of Programming Languages. He is a graduate of Harvard College and Brown University and is a nominated member of the Python Software Foundation.

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Video recorded: 

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Strategies, motivations, and influencing adoption of testing for scientific code

Date and Time: 
2013 October 24th @ 3:00pm
Location: 
ML-132 Main Seminar
Speaker: 
Ian Truslove and Erik Jasiak

Computation and programming are increasingly inescapable in modern Earth Sciences, but scientists and researchers receive little or no formal software engineering or programming training. At the same time, research into the reproducibility of other academic papers exposing disappointingly low rates of repeatability and high-profile retractions due to computational or data errors increase the onus on researchers to write repeatable, reliable, even reusable programs; in other words, "write better code".

Speaker Description: 

Ian Truslove is a software engineer at NSIDC, working on services-based web applications. He has worked in various software roles for over twelve years, and has been learning and practicing agile development practices for the last seven.

Erik Jasiak is the Head of Software Development and Portfolio Manager at NSIDC, where he is responsible for managing, leading, and coordinating development efforts across projects. He has worked in the technology industry for seventeen years in both the public and private sector; he started using iterative development practices back when they called it "Extreme Programming" in 2000, and been working to revamp software and technology cultures in the Earth and Space Sciences over the last three years.

Event Category:

Video recorded: 

Slides

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The Assimilation Project: Discovery and Monitoring Without Limit

Date and Time: 
2013 Sept 26th @ 3pm
Location: 
CG1-1214 North Auditorium
Speaker: 
Alan Robertson

The Assimilation Project provides integrated IT discovery and monitoring aimed at risk management and mitigation. Discovery finds systems, services, dependencies, including services you aren’t monitoring and systems you’ve forgotten about. About 30% of all outside security breaches come through forgotten systems. Discovery is continuous and has zero-network-footprint.; Monitoring is extremely scalable due to a radically distributed architecture. Discovery informs monitoring - simplifying configuration and maintenance.

Speaker Description: 

Alan is a well-known speaker on high availability, discovery, monitoring, scalability and graph databases having spoken at over 30 conferences over the world. He founded and leads the Assimilation Project providing scalable, continuous IT discovery and monitoring. He also founded the Linux-HA project (currently known as Pacemaker) and led it for about 10 years.

He works for Assimilation Systems Limited which he founded to develop and support the Assimilation Project. He previously worked at IBM, SuSE, and Bell Labs.

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Video recorded: 

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A comparison of climate applications on accelerated and conventional architectures

Date and Time: 
2013 August 29th @ 3pm
Location: 
ML-132 Main Seminar
Speaker: 
Srinath Vadlamani, Youngsung Kim, John Dennis

Contributing author: John Dennis

Speaker Description: 

Srinath Vadlamani obtained his Ph.D. from CU-Boulder in 2005 in Applied Mathematics with advisor Jim Meiss. Dr. Vadlamani did his post-doc for a year at the Univ. of Washington with Uri Shumlack developing finite volume methods for MHD simulations of innovative fusion confinement concepts. He returned to Boulder in 2006 and Tech-X Corporation working with algorithm development for MHD and gyrokinetic codes. He was part of the FACETS integrated modeling SCIDAC effort and created the interlagnuage interoperable generator that exposed fortran transport codes to the C++ FACETS framework. In Aug. 2012, Dr. Vadlamani joined NCAR's ASAP group to help with efficient usage of accelerated hardware for NCAR's climate codes.

After an undergraduate degree in Electronic Engineering at Dankook University of South Korea, Youngsung Kim has worked in mobile telecommunication industry for 13 years mostly as a software developer. In 2010, he returned back to school at University of Utah and majored in Scientific Computing. During the study, he participated WRF climate simulation project and brain image matching project along with taking core courses including numerical methods and parallel computing. After graduation with master's degree from Univ. of Utah, he joined NCAR and has been working on accelerator technologies until now.

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WRF in the Cloud: Practical Big Compute on Windows Azure

Date and Time: 
2013 August 1st @ 3pm
Location: 
FL2-1022 Large Auditorium
Speaker: 
Wenming Ye

Windows Azure has become a mature business cloud platform in the last two years. While web 2.0 companies enjoy the benefits of cloud on Windows Azure, the general research and scientific computing communities are just getting familiar with the platform. With the availability of IAAS Linux, Hadoop, IPython Notebooks, F#, Microsoft's Cloud Platform offers researchers the convenience to collaborate, and share their research online better. In this talk we’ll demonstrate the readiness of the crucial Big Compute and Big Data enabler technologies on Windows Azure for researchers.

Speaker Description: 

After completing his graduate work at CU Boulder, Mr. Ye joined SRI International, where he focused on design and development of innovative wireless, handheld, and Web-based simulation tools and services. Mr. Ye returned to Boulder as a developer on the commercialization team at Tech-X Corp, where he developed and productized large-scale HPC software. Mr. Ye is currently a Senior Research Program Manager responsible for Cloud-based Big Data and Big Compute projects at Microsoft Research.

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Building Python-Based Operational Systems for Prediction of Atmospheric Processes

Date and Time: 
2013 June 20th @ 3pm
Location: 
FL2-1022 Large Auditorium
Speaker: 
Don Morton

In the context of atmospheric models, operational systems are those that dependably provide important, time-critical forecasts for use in decision-support systems.  They are characterized by the need for rapid data acquisition and model setup, reliable execution of the model, and post-processing activities that sometimes require delivery of model output timesteps as soon as they are completed.  In Alaska, reliable and timely weather forecasts are essential for a variety of commercial, recreational, and simple day-to-day living activities.

Speaker Description: 

Don Morton is currently a Research Professor of Computer Science at the University of Alaska Arctic Region Supercomputing Center, and has recently launched a private venture, Boreal Scientific Computing LLC, as a mechanism for contributing operational forecasting expertise to a variety of organisations.  With a B.S. in Computer Science from the College of Great Falls, Montana, and a Ph.D. from Louisiana State University, Don has spent his career trying to apply his talents in computer science to his passion for science, especially the environmental sciences.  

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Open Source and Flexibility

Date and Time: 
2013 May 16th @ 3:00pm
Location: 
ML-132 Main Seminar
Speaker: 
Simon Phipps
When we think of open source, it's easy to believe it's just about licensing software. But the core value it brings is actually flexibility - the creation of fluid cultures where innovation can flow freely and where software can be adapted as needs changed with the minimum of interference from outside your organisation.
Speaker Description: 

Simon Phipps is President at the Open Source Initiative (OSI), the non-profit organisation that advocates for open source software, builds bridges between open source communities and maintains the canonical list of open source licenses. Currently an independent consultant on open source policy and practice, he was previously head of open source at Sun Microsystems, CSO of startup Forgerock and a founder of IBM’s Java business unit.

Apart from his pro bono participation at OSI, he is also on the board of the Open Rights Group and the leadership team of The Document Foundation. He has been widely involved in standardisation activities, including as a founding director of the Open Mobile Alliance and as one of the Sun executives sponsoring the donation of resources to OASIS to create Open Document Format (ODF). He is a Fellow of the British Computer Society as well as an Open Forum Fellow.

http://webmink.com/

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