seminar

Fortran Preprocessor

Date and Time: 
2014 August 28th @ 3pm
Location: 
ML-132 Main Seminar
Speaker: 
Daniel Nagle

CoCo is a preprocessor for Fortran originally specified by Part 3 of the Fortran standard. CoCo is aware of Fortran line and statement rules, and supports the usual features of a preprocessor: file inclusion and conditional compilation. CoCo is more structured than other preprocessors, requiring declaration of all symbols used. CoCo supports Fortran assertions, generic programming, software testing, and has features to support large projects.

Speaker Description: 

Daniel Nagle is the chair of PL22.3 (formerly J3) Fortran Standard Committee. He got his PhD in Computational Science from GMU and is working in UCAR’s Consulting Service Group. He has been using and teaching Fortran since the '60s and has been parallel programming in Fortran and other languages since the '80s

Event Category:

Extending the functionality of Quantum GIS via plugins

Date and Time: 
2014 July 24th @ 3pm
Location: 
FL2-1003
Speaker: 
Guido Cervone

In this talk we will address the analysis of non-authoritative sources for situation awareness during emergencies. In the first part of the talk, we will describe the overall scope of the ONR project funding our research, which involves the fusion of remote sensing and social media. In the second part of the talk, we will show specifically how QGIS can be extended and used to analyze data from Tweeter.

Speaker Description: 

Guido Cervone is Director of GeoInformatics & Earth Observation Laboratory in the Department of Geography and Institute for CyberScience at the Pennsylvania State University and Associate Professor at the Department of Geography, Institute for CyberScience, GeoVISTA Center The Pennsylvania State University. He is also affiliated faculty in the Research Application Laboratory (RAL) at the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR).

His fields of expertise are geoinformatics, machine learning and remote sensing. His research focuses on the development and application of computational algorithms for the analysis of spatio-temporal remote sensing, numerical modeling and social media “Big Data” related to man-made, technological and environmental hazards. He operates a satellite receiving station for NOAA POES satellites. His research us funded by ONR, DOT, NASA, Italian Ministry of Research and Education, Draper Labs, Stormcenter Communication.

Guido Cervone is a member of the advisory committee of the United National Environmental Programme, division of Disasters and Early Warning Assessment. In 2013 he received the “Medaglia di Rappresentanza” from the President of the Italian Republic for his work related to the Fukushima crisis. He received the 2013 ISNAAF award. He co-chaired the 2010 SIGSPATIAL Data Mining for Geoinformatics (DMG-10) workshop. He served as the program co-chair for the 2008 and 2009 IEEE International Conference on Data Mining (ICDM) Spatial and Spatio-Temporal Data Mining (SSTDM) workshop.

He authored two edited books, over forty fully refereed articles relative to data mining, remote sensing and environmental hazards. In 2010, he was awarded a US patent for an anomaly detection algorithm. His research on natural hazards was featured on TV news and newspapers, on general interest magazines such as National Geographic, and on international magazines.

Event Category:

Coarrays in GFortran

Date and Time: 
2014 June 19th @ 3:00pm
Location: 
ML-132 Main Seminar
Speaker: 
Alessandro Fanfarillo

Fortran Coarrays allow the Fortran programmer to realize parallel programs without explicitly using communication libraries. Currently, the most complete Coarrays support is provided by commercial compilers like Cray and Intel. In this talk the GFortran Coarrays implementation will be presented with a exhaustive set of comparison test cases.

Speaker Description: 

Alessandro Fanfarillo is a PhD Student in Computer Science, Control and Geoinformation at University of Rome Tor Vergata. He is interested in High Performance Computing (mainly sparse matrix computation), in particular on hybrid cluster architectures (accelerators clusters) and PGAS languages.

Event Category:

Video recorded: 

If you use a non-flash enabled device, you may download the video here

Fortran Preprocessor

Date and Time: 
TBD (cancelled due to building evacuation)
Location: 
ML-132 Main Seminar
Speaker: 
Daniel Nagle

CoCo is a preprocessor for Fortran originally specified by Part 3 of the Fortran standard. CoCo is aware of Fortran line and statement rules, and supports the usual features of a preprocessor: file inclusion and conditional compilation. CoCo is more structured than other preprocessors, requiring declaration of all symbols used. CoCo supports Fortran assertions, generic programming, software testing, and has features to support large projects.

Speaker Description: 

Daniel Nagle is the chair of PL22.3 (formerly J3) Fortran Standard Committee. He got his PhD in Computational Science from GMU and is working in UCAR’s Consulting Service Group. He has been using and teaching Fortran since the '60s and has been parallel programming in Fortran and other languages since the '80s

Event Category:

How Python's Decorators and Generators simplify Asynchronous Coding

Date and Time: 
2014 April 24th @ 3pm
Location: 
FL-1022 Large Auditorium
Speaker: 
Joe VanAndel

Controlling and monitoring hardware often requires handling multiple concurrent operations, including querying instruments via remote procedure calls, sending commands to instruments over TCP/IP sockets, and monitoring devices via SNMP, while continuing to respond to status requests. One solution is to write servers with multiple threads that coordinate via semaphores. However, multithreaded Python programs can be difficult to write and debug.

Speaker Description: 

Joe VanAndel is a software engineer in the Remote Sensing Facility in EOL. Joe graduated from Calvin College, Grand Rapids, MI with a double major of mathematics and physics in 1978. He earned a Master's degree in Computer Science at University of California at Berkeley in 1980. Joe worked at AT&T Bell Laboratories in Westminster, CO on a real-time operating system called Oryx/Pecos. His next job was with Cadnetix, where he worked on porting Unix to proprietary workstations and servers, computer aided design tools, and software configuration management. In 1988, Joe started working at NCAR/EOL and lead a software team that transformed a prototype weather radar into a research testbed serving the FAA and the National Weather Service. Joe has continued to work with radars and lidars, working on diagnostic software, data acquisition hardware and software, fuzzy logic-based data classification tools, radar control software, web-based user interfaces, data displays, and hardware/software monitoring tools.

Event Category:

Video recorded: 

If you use a non-flash enabled device, you may download the video here

Docker: What's in it for me?

Date and Time: 
2014 March 20th @ 3pm
Location: 
ML-132 Main Seminar
Speaker: 
Ian Truslove

Docker is a new containerization tool that seems to be all the rage. But what is it, what is it being used for, and more importantly, "what's in it for me?" This presentation will provide a developer/devops point of view of some introductory concepts and tools used to build, deploy and run Docker containers, and how Docker might fit into highly scalable web application architectures.

Speaker Description: 

Ian Truslove is a software engineer working on large cloud-based archiving solutions for Sonian. He has worked in various software roles for quite some time now, and has been learning, working with, contributing to, leading and coaching agile teams with agile development practices for the last seven. Contact Ian at @iantruslove

Event Category:

Video recorded: 

If you use a non-flash enabled device, you may download the video here

Documentation with Doxygen and DocBook

Date and Time: 
2014 January 30th @ 3pm
Location: 
ML-132 Main Seminar
Speaker: 
Craig Ruff

Description:

Speaker Description: 

Craig is a software engineer in the Data Analysis Services Group of CISL, where he is responsible for assisting with the provision and administation of high performance shared file systems, data management and data transfer applications. He has been at NCAR since 1987, and has in the past worked on the NCAR Mass Storage System (MSS), Text and Graphics Server (TAGS), networked applications, device drivers and the administration of networked computer systems using a number of types operating systems.

Event Category:

Video recorded: 

If you use a non-flash enabled device, you may download the video here

Scalable realtime architectures using Python on Storm

Date and Time: 
2013 November 14th @ 3pm
Location: 
CG1-1214 North Auditorium
Speaker: 
Jim Baker
Description
 
Speaker Description: 
 Jim is a committer on Jython, for which he has worked on nearly every aspect from compilation to Unicode, and a co-author of the Definitive Guide to Jython. Jim is a senior software developer at Rackspace, where he works at the intersection of big data and cloud computing. He is also a lecturer in computer science at the University of Colorado at Boulder, where he teaches Principles of Programming Languages. He is a graduate of Harvard College and Brown University and is a nominated member of the Python Software Foundation.

Event Category:

Video recorded: 

If you use a non-flash enabled device, you may download the video here

Strategies, motivations, and influencing adoption of testing for scientific code

Date and Time: 
2013 October 24th @ 3:00pm
Location: 
ML-132 Main Seminar
Speaker: 
Ian Truslove and Erik Jasiak

Computation and programming are increasingly inescapable in modern Earth Sciences, but scientists and researchers receive little or no formal software engineering or programming training. At the same time, research into the reproducibility of other academic papers exposing disappointingly low rates of repeatability and high-profile retractions due to computational or data errors increase the onus on researchers to write repeatable, reliable, even reusable programs; in other words, "write better code".

Speaker Description: 

Ian Truslove is a software engineer at NSIDC, working on services-based web applications. He has worked in various software roles for over twelve years, and has been learning and practicing agile development practices for the last seven.

Erik Jasiak is the Head of Software Development and Portfolio Manager at NSIDC, where he is responsible for managing, leading, and coordinating development efforts across projects. He has worked in the technology industry for seventeen years in both the public and private sector; he started using iterative development practices back when they called it "Extreme Programming" in 2000, and been working to revamp software and technology cultures in the Earth and Space Sciences over the last three years.

Event Category:

Video recorded: 

Slides

If you use a non-flash enabled device, you may download the video here

The Assimilation Project: Discovery and Monitoring Without Limit

Date and Time: 
2013 Sept 26th @ 3pm
Location: 
CG1-1214 North Auditorium
Speaker: 
Alan Robertson

The Assimilation Project provides integrated IT discovery and monitoring aimed at risk management and mitigation. Discovery finds systems, services, dependencies, including services you aren’t monitoring and systems you’ve forgotten about. About 30% of all outside security breaches come through forgotten systems. Discovery is continuous and has zero-network-footprint.; Monitoring is extremely scalable due to a radically distributed architecture. Discovery informs monitoring - simplifying configuration and maintenance.

Speaker Description: 

Alan is a well-known speaker on high availability, discovery, monitoring, scalability and graph databases having spoken at over 30 conferences over the world. He founded and leads the Assimilation Project providing scalable, continuous IT discovery and monitoring. He also founded the Linux-HA project (currently known as Pacemaker) and led it for about 10 years.

He works for Assimilation Systems Limited which he founded to develop and support the Assimilation Project. He previously worked at IBM, SuSE, and Bell Labs.

Event Category:

Video recorded: 

If you use a non-flash enabled device, you may download the video here

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